The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

The Yellow Wallpaper - Kindle edition by Gilman, Charlotte Perkins ...

“The Yellow Wallpaper” is told as a series of journal entries written by a woman who has gone to a country manor to recover from what is assumed at this time to be postpartum depression.  Her loving husband, John, follows the recommendation of doctors of the day (he is also a doctor), and sequesters the woman so that she might rest and recover. She is not supposed to exercise or write,  instead letting repose heal her. The woman (whose name is never learned) is not allowed to leave her room, which has yellow wallpaper. As time progresses, the woman becomes convinced that the wallpaper moves and there is someone in the wallpaper trying to get out.

I really can’t accurately describe the creepy feel of this story. While it is ultimately a tale of the deterioration of the woman’s mental state (due to the absolutely absurd treatment of mental illness in the late 1800’s, when this was written), there is an eerie vibe to it. The writing is astounding. I was immediately drawn in. I can see why this story is considered a classic.

When I began the book, I thought it was odd that the color of the wallpaper was such a big deal. However, I soon found that it makes perfect sense. The metaphors found throughout are amazing, conveying the hopelessness the woman felt regarding her situation.

It isn’t a happy-go-lucky story, but it is a compelling one. And the ending! Holy terror, Batman! Gilman’s writing is excellent. I highly recommend reading this story.

Awenydd and Conversations with a Country Boy by J.R. Maston

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“Awenydd” is an exploration of the self, growth, and measuring our internal perspective against the world around us. “Conversations With A Country Boy” is a collection of memories, recollections and thoughts on the culture and lives of the people growing up in rural Northern California.From the author of “Velvet” and “The Jar Curse.” (taken from Amazon)

I don’t often review poetry, probably because it’s such a personal medium. I find poetry to either be beautiful and real, or trite and annoying. There’s really no in-between for me. J.R. Maston’s poetry is of the beautiful and real variety.

What I loved about this collection was how incredibly raw it was. There was no holding back, or shying away. This isn’t a book about happy trees, or cute bunnies. It’s more like a conversation held late at night, when people are too tired to quiet themselves and their hidden thoughts and fears come out. Some of the poems felt so brutally honest that they were tough to read. I loved them, though.

This collection felt like a journey: you can walk it with the author. Themes of nostalgia, love, regret, loss, and healing can be found throughout. I can’t really say that I had a favorite poem: more like lines and snippets that stuck with me. At the moment,  parts from “Little Gray Dove” are circling though my mind.

“You know sometimes grief is like a little gray dove
we take him into the cup of our hand
we take all the time we need
whisper into him our sorrow”… (excerpt from “Little Gray Dove”)

I highly recommend this book, as well as the other collections by Maston: Velvet, and The Jar Curse.  

My Life in Books Tag

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I saw this fantastic tag on Irresponsible Reader’s blog, which everyone should follow. Conveniently, I have it linked here. I don’t know who the original creator of this tag is: if you do, please let me know so I can give credit where credit is due.

Find a book for each of your initials:

W- We Ride the Storm by Devin Madson
We Ride the Storm (The Reborn Empire, #1) by Devin Madson

S- Soulforge by Margaret Weis
The Soulforge (Dragonlance: The Raistlin Chronicles, Book 1 ...

B– To Best the Boys by Mary Weber
Amazon.com: To Best the Boys (9780718080969): Weber, Mary: Books

Count your age along your bookshelf: What book do you land on?

It depends on which of my shelves I start on. It’s either The Seven and Half Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton, Oddmire: Changeling by William Ritter, The Devouring Gray by Christine Lynn Herman, or Story of the World Volume 4 (homeschool curriculum).

A book set in your city/country-

A Gathering of Saints by Robert Lindsey
A Gathering of Saints: Lindsey, Robert: 9781501153112: Amazon.com ...

I grew up in Salt Lake City, Utah. I love this fascinating nonfiction about the LDS church, forged religious documents, and other things that are too wild to be made up.

A book that represents a destination that you’d love to travel to-

Dubliners by James Joyce
Dubliners by James Joyce - Kindle edition by Joyce, James ...


A book that’s your favorite Color- 
My favorite colors are dark green and burgundy. I’m having a hard time thinking of a book with both colors on the cover.
The Annotated Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie, Maria Tatar, 9780393066005

Which book do you have the fondest memories of? I don’t have just one. I do remember racing to check out Saint George and the Dragon by Margaret Hodges, when I was young. Actually, this cover has close to  my favorite colors in it.
Saint George and the Dragon: Margaret Hodges, Trina Schart Hyman ...

Which book did you have the most difficulty reading? A Child Called It by David Pelzer is the most upsetting and brutal book I’ve ever read.
A Child Called It: One Child's Courage to Survive: Pelzer, Dave ...
Which book on your tbr will give you the most satisfaction to finish? I haven’t made it through E=MC2 by David Bodanis yet. I was struggling to understand it the last time I tried…one of these days I’ll make it through.
E=mc2: A Biography of the World's Most Famous Equation.: David ...

I’m not tagging anyone in particular, but I’d love to see what other people come up with.