A Class Above: Books for Fans of D&D

Throughout this week, I’ve been discussing Dungeons and Dragons’ character classes, and giving examples of each class in literature. I have had an enormous amount of help with this. So many bookbloggers and authors have contributed to each post and I want to give a huge THANK YOU to everyone who made this series so awesome: Behind the Pages, Ricardo Victoria, Ryan Howse, The Swordsmith, Geeky Galaxy, Beneath a Thousand Skies, Bees and Books, The Irresponsible Reader, Kerri McBookNerd, and The Cyberbard. There is no way this series would have worked out without all of you taking the time and effort to contribute. You are the best!

I figure the appropriate way to end this week’s posts would be to shake it up a little bit: instead of talking about D&D classes in novels, I’m going to give some suggestions of novels for fans of Dungeons and Dragons. I’ll explain a little bit about the reason behind my picks. And..away we go!

First, before I run away with it, Geeky Galaxy has a recommendation:

NPCs by Drew Hayes

What happens when the haggling is done and the shops are closed? When the quest has been given, the steeds saddled, and the adventurers are off to their next encounter? They keep the world running, the food cooked, and the horses shoed, yet what adventurer has ever spared a thought or concern for the Non-Player Characters? (taken from Amazon)

“NPCs is a lot less serious and lots more fun. If you’ve wondered what happens when your adventuring party disappears, leaving the locals of the average fantasy tavern to pick up the pieces, NPCs is the book for you. Perfect for D&D and fantasy video games (think Divinity: Original Sin 2 or Skyrim), then this may just be the book for you!”

Now, brace yourself: I’m about to spout opinions.

Kings of the Wyld by Nicholas Eames

Clay Cooper and his band were once the best of the best, the most feared and renowned crew of mercenaries this side of the Heartwyld.

Their glory days long past, the mercs have grown apart and grown old, fat, drunk, or a combination of the three. Then an ex-bandmate turns up at Clay’s door with a plea for help — the kind of mission that only the very brave or the very stupid would sign up for.

It’s time to get the band back together. (taken from Amazon)

Oh, how I loved this book! This is the best “we’re getting the band back together” book I think I’ve ever read. It’s also perfect for fans of roleplaying games. It has an effortless sense of humor, lots of viscera (and heart), the group dynamic, and it’s just flat-out fun. (Review)

Dragonlance Chronicles by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman

Once merely creatures of legend, the dragons have returned to Krynn. But with their arrival comes the departure of the old gods—and all healing magic. As war threatens to engulf the land, lifelong friends reunite for an adventure that will change their lives and shape their world forever . . . 
 
When Tanis, Sturm, Caramon, Raistlin, Flint, and Tasslehoff see a woman use a blue crystal staff to heal a villager, they wonder if it’s a sign the gods have not abandoned them after all. Fueled by this glimmer of hope, the Companions band together to uncover the truth behind the gods’ absence—though they aren’t the only ones with an interest in the staff. The Seekers, a new religious order, wants the artifact for their own ends, believing it will help them replace the gods and overtake the continent of Ansalon. Now, the Companions must assume the unlikely roles of heroes if they hope to prevent the staff from falling into the hands of darkness. (taken from Amazon)

If you’ve followed my blog for a while, there’s no way you’re surprised that I brought Dragonlance into this. I promise, it isn’t my adoration of this series that puts it on the list. It absolutely fits. Originally, this trilogy was written in conjunction with TSR (now owned by Wizards of the Coast, the creators of Dungeons and Dragons). It has that adventuring feel, a mismatched group of companions that have to fight inner and outer darkness, and a vast world peopled with all sorts of fantastical creatures. Oh- and did I mention that there are actually Dragonlance campaign settings? Yup, you can totally play D&D in Dragonlance’s world of Krynn.

Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan

The Wheel of Time turns and Ages come and pass, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth, and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth returns again. What was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow.

When The Two Rivers is attacked by Trollocs–a savage tribe of half-men, half-beasts–five villagers flee that night into a world they barely imagined, with new dangers waiting in the shadows and in the light. (taken from Amazon)

Not only is there the D&D party dynamic, this series has something that most gamers will recognize: characters “level up”. They don’t start out awesome. Instead, they improve as they go along, facing bigger challenges as their skills grow.

Lexcalibur: Useful Poetry for Adventurers Above and Below the World by Jerry Holkins and Mike Krahulik

And now for something different. Lexcalibur is not a novel. Nope. Instead, it’s a poetry collection that is perfect for roleplaying gamers and fantasy lovers of all kinds. It’s full of humor and wonder. (Review)

Okay, gamers, your turn: what books give you that wonderful “D&D feel”?

Links to the blog series:

A Class Above: D&D Classes in Books- Fighters and Barbarians
A Class Above: D&D Classes in Books- Paladins, Clerics, and Druids
A Class Above: D&D Classes in Books- Rogues and Rangers
A Class Above: D&D Classes in Books- Bards and Magic Users

11 thoughts on “A Class Above: Books for Fans of D&D

  1. An excellent smattering of books that exude that D&D feel, both in its classic and in its modern form. A series that deserves mention is Mark Lawrence’s “One Word Kill,” for its clever use of D&D as part of the plotting of those three novels. It’s a conceit I’ve been thinking about for some time, now, and the more I do, the more I have to admire Lawrence for what he’s done with D&D.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I just read Kill the Farm Boy by Deliah S. Dawson & Kevin Hearne last month and it absolutely fits this bill too. It can be a bit over the top for some readers but you can tell from little details the authors included that they play, it really made me miss all the fun I had playing with my friends.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. NPC sounds good. And you already know my feelings on Dragonlance 🙂 And I really liked Kings of the Wyld.
    The Riyria Revelations might be close. Thief/rogue and fighter dynamic.

    Like

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