The D&D Connection: Authors and TTRPGs

I’ve noticed something over the last year: many great fantasy authors play D&D. Enough so that it seems there might be a connection between great storytelling and great writing. As table top role-playing games (ttrps) become more of a focus in popular culture, it’s turned into more of a draw for people who maybe haven’t played before. From being considered the game of outsiders and socially inept kids, it’s been shown to be something else. It can be a way to relieve stress, a fun way to pass the time with friends. But maybe it is sometimes something more. Maybe it is a conduit to creativity, a way to practice the art of storytelling, and inspiration for authors? What about the writers who have always played? What has drawn them to these fantastical worlds and situations? Is it a continuation of the very personality traits that led them to write in the first place? Is it inspiration? Or is it just a rocking good time? These are things I’ve been wondering about.

I’m joined this week by several authors as we discuss D&D, its role in storytelling and the effect (or not) that it has on their writing. I’m incredibly grateful to be able to chat about roleplaying, both as a fan of roleplaying and as a reader of excellent fantasy books. I had way too much fun talking to these writers of some amazing fantasy and sci-fi books. Here’s a list, in no particular order, of who to expect this week:

Rob Edwards, author of The Ascension Machine

Amazon

Rowena Andrews, author of The Ravyn’s Words

Amazon

Jonathan Nevair, author of the Wind Tide series

Amazon US

Amazon UK

Jeff Speight, author of Paladin Unbound

Amazon

Zack Argyle, author of the Threadlight series

Amazon

Dorian Hart, author of the Heroes of Spira series

Amazon

Dan Fitzgerald, author of the Maer Cycle

Amazon

Ricardo Victoria, author of the Tempest Blades series

Amazon

Thomas Howard Riley, author of We Break Immortals

Amazon UK

Amazon US

8 thoughts on “The D&D Connection: Authors and TTRPGs

  1. I played D&D as a teenager, and I can see how the game would inspire players to write fantasy stories. Such imagination is used in the game, unlike the action playing out on a screen in video games. That imagination can jump into other worlds and craft characters and scenarios.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes! As I was researching for N this series and chatting with the guest authors, I was constantly being surprised at things that had originated as a small moment in a campaign. None of the authors I interviewed wrote books that would be considered RPGlit either. I think D&D can be a great jumping off point.

      Liked by 1 person

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