Book Tag: 90s Music Edition

I saw this fantastic tag on Read to Ramble’s excellent blog. Make sure to check it out! I’ve been incredibly nostalgic lately, and this tag seemed to feed right into that, so of course I had to take part!

What’s My Age Again- Blink 182:

At what age did you discover your love of reading?

I have always loved books, as long as I can remember. I remember riding in a red wagon when my mom walked to the library. Those trips were always fun, and I’ve carried that love of books and libraries with me ever since.

All Star- Smash Mouth:

What is your favorite genre?

While I’ve branched out over the years, fantasy will always be my absolute favorite. There’s something wonderful about being able to read a book where the limits of the real world don’t apply.

Breakfast at Tiffany’s – Deep Blue Something:

What’s your go-to reading snack/drink?

I don’t necessarily have a favorite since I’m usually reading anytime I have a spare minute: when folding laundry, while the kids are watching an animated something that I can’t stand, during lunch…I almost always have a mug of coffee, though.

Give It Away – Red Hot Chili Peppers:

What book do you ALWAYS recommend to people?

First and foremost, I have to say for the record: I loathe the Red Hot Chili Peppers. There, now that I’ve gotten that out of the way, I can move on to the question. I tend to recommend differing books based on who I’m talking to, but I find myself suggesting The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern and The Dragonlance Chronicles by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman more than any others. The Last Smile in Sunder City by Luke Arnold is coming pretty dang close to catching up, though, which is saying something since the other books have 10+ years of suggesting on it.

…Baby One More Time – Britney Spears:

A book or series you have read more than once?

If I love a book, I’ll read it more than once. I love revisiting stories that I loved. It’s like seeing an old friend. If I tried to list all the books I’ve read multiple times, I’d be sitting at the computer for a very, very long time.

Tearin’ Up My Heart – N’Sync:

A book that broke your heart to finish?

A Child Called It by David J. Pelzer is the most upsetting book I’ve ever read. I had to finish it in the hope that the poor boy would end up in a better situation. I will never read that book again.

Smells Like Teen Spirit – Nirvana:

A book that you read as a teen that you still love today?

Oh, there are so many! The Dragonlance books are on the list, of course, as is The Hobbit, Ender’s Game and Ender’s Shadow, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Paradise Lost…the list goes on.

Hurt- Nine Inch Nails:

What book do you love that deals with heavier subjects?

The Perks of Being a Wallflower talks about harsh subjects that are nonetheless important. Instead of being a complete downer, it handles the difficult themes with grace, dignity, and an underlying feeling of hope. And yes, I added this question myself. I’m a rebel like that.

I’m not going to tag anyone, but I’d love to see some others answer these questions! If you do, please tag me so I can see what you came up with.

Liebster Award

First and foremost, let me give a huge thank you to I’m All Booked Up for nominating me for this award!

RULES:

  1. Thank the blogger who nominated you and give a link to their blog.
  2. Answer the 11 questions asked of you.
  3. Nominate 11 other bloggers.
  4. Ask ‘your nominees’ 11 questions.
  5. Notify your nominees once you have uploaded your post.

What genre of books can you not live without?

I dabble in other genres, but I’m a fantasy girl through and through. Bonus points if the fantasy book has dragons.

You’re packing for a week’s vacation and can only pack books you already own: which three do you bring? 

I’m going to start right off by cheating. Isn’t that awesome of me? Instead of taking three books, I’m picking two books and a trilogy. If you’ve followed my blog for a while, you won’t be remotely surprised by my choices of: The Dragonlance Chronicles trilogy, The Night Circus, and The Perks of Being a Wallflower.

Which of your favorite books would you like to see become a Netflix series? 

Absolutely none of them, unless I’m casting, writing the script, and directing. If I love a book, I want it to be left alone. I’m persnickety like that.

What was the last book series you binged? 

I honestly couldn’t say. Usually what happens is I get a book, I love the book, then realize the sequel isn’t out yet. I read multiple books at once, though, so my reading habits are all kinds of wonky.

If you could only have three apps on your phone for blogging, which ones would you pick?

The only blogging apps that I have on my phone are WordPress and Twitter.

 What is your dream literary-inspired Halloween costume? 

I don’t dress up for Halloween all that often, but I did dress as a rêveur from The Night Circus one year. I suppose going as Raistlin from Dragons of Spring Dawning could be fun.

If you could be anywhere in the world, where would you go?

I’d love to visit anyplace that has autumn leaves right now. The leaves don’t change color where I currently live, and I really miss the beautiful reds and golds.

Which book character do you relate to most?

I could tell you, but then I’d have to kill you. Just kidding. I think I’m more of a conglomeration of many characters that I’ve read over the years.

Coffee, tea or hot chocolate?

I drink coffee at breakfast, right before bed (it doesn’t keep me awake at night, I think I’ve built up an immunity), and sometimes in the middle of the afternoon. Hmmm…I’m not drinking too much coffee, am I?

Do you want to publish a novel one day?

There’s always been an author niggle at the back of my brain, but I really don’t have any ideas. If I get an idea that I feel needs to come out, I’ll write then. Whether it would be any good is a completely different question.

Which author would you most like to have dinner with?

I think having dinner with Alexander Dumas would be absolutely fascinating. He has a history, his dad was an interesting person in his own right, and if Dumas spoke the way he wrote, it would be an engrossing meal.

My Questions:

  1. What’s your go-to genre?
  2. What is a book or series that you’re forever singing the praises of?
  3. What do you love about blogging?
  4. Are there any books that you read specifically at a certain time of year?
  5. What’s the best book you read in 2019?
  6. What non-bookish thing do you do for fun?
  7. Which author would you like to have dinner with?
  8. What was your favorite book when you were a child?
  9. What book character do you most relate to?
  10. What is your favorite reading spot?
  11. What new or upcoming release are you most excited for?

My nominations:

The Orang-utan Librarian
Way Too Fantasy
Stephen Writes
Becky’s Book Blog
Mani’s Book Corner
Leah’s Books
One Book More
The Geekish Brunette
My Heart is Booked Blog
Novel Lives
Kerri McBookNerd

The Ultimate Book Tag

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I saw this great tag on both Way too Fantasy and the Irresponsible Reader’s blogs, and just had to do it myself. Check out their answers: they’re fantastic. Here’s mine. I’m sure I’ll ramble, so brace yourself.

Do you get sick while reading in the car? Nope. Well, I did when I was pregnant, but pretty much everything made me sick, so I don’t think that counts.

Which author’s writing style is completely unique to you and why? The first name that comes to mind is Chuck Palahniuk. His writing is flat-out bizarre. Although, I recently read an excellent book called You Favorite Band Cannot Save You by Scotto Moore that also had that Palahniuk vibe (that’s a good thing). So…I’ll probably go with Luke Arnold’s The Last Smile in Sunder City. I’ve seen movies with that Sam Spade-type narration, but I’ve never read a book with it, much less a fantasy. My husband has informed me that I have to read Dashiell Hammett, who created Sam Spade. Either way, Luke Arnold is a fantastic author. I definitely suggest reading him.

Harry Potter or Twilight? Give Three Reasons Why? With apologies to all Twilight fans, Harry Potter:

1. I thought Twilight was a trilogy and didn’t read one of the books, either the second or the third one. It made zero difference to the story, which says a lot about its importance (or lack thereof). I still haven’t read whichever book it was.
2. It was very much a romance, which isn’t my bag. Also, it was an icky romance.
3. The whole werewolf imprinting on Bella’s kid thing is just weird.

Do you carry a book bag? If so, what’s in it? I don’t carry one anymore. Anytime I do use a purse, it has to be big enough to fit a book. My favorite purse looks like a copy of Alice in Wonderland. It’s pretty perfect.

Do you smell your books? (*Sniff* ) I’ll never tell.

Books with or without illustrations? It depends on the type of book. I’m a big fan of children’s fairy tales, and I’m a sucker for any book with dragon art in it. If it’s a novel, though, I’m partial to maps.

What book did you love while reading, but discovered later didn’t have quality writing? The Mortal Instruments and the Infernal Devices by Cassandra Clare are pretty poorly written. I wouldn’t say that I discovered that later on,though. I was pretty much aware of that from the beginning. I love them anyway. They’re my guilty pleasures. I blame Magnus Bane.

Do you have any funny stories from your childhood involving books? I was around twelve years old or so, and it was Christmastime. I was sitting in a chair next to the tree, completely engrossed in my book. I still remember what I was reading: Kindred Spirits by Mark Anthony. The tree slowly toppled over and encased me in a cage of pine needles and ornaments. It wasn’t funny at the time, but it cracks me up looking back on it.

What is the thinnest book on your shelf? Um, not counting the many picture books we have floating around? Probably Queens of Fennbirn by Kendare Blake, or Hollow Men by Todd Sullivan. By the way, both of those books are good and you should read them.

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What is the thickest book you own? War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy is pretty hefty. It’s a good one, though. The Tanakh is also big, as is The Light of All that Falls. Which book do you think wins “thickest book” title? Please ignore my horrible photography skills.

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Do you write as well as read? Do you see yourself becoming an author in the future? What, writing for a blog doesn’t count? Psshaw! As for writing a book, if I ever have an idea that I feel needs to be written, I’ll go for it. Right now, though, I’ve got nothing.

When did you first get into reading? I can’t think of a time when I didn’t have my nose in a book. I remember trips to the library being amazing expeditions when I was young. Before the pandemic, my husband and I would take our kids to the library every weekend. I really miss it. They do too.

What is your favorite classic book? Oh, that’s a hard one! I think I’ll go with The Three Musketeers by Alexander Dumas. Excellent book. Read it.

If you were given a book as a present that you’ve already read and hated, what would you do? I would thank the person. How I felt about the book is unimportant; that someone thought to give me a gift will always be appreciated.

What is a lesser known book you know of that is similar to the Harry Potter series and the Hunger Games series? I can’t really think of anything similar to the Hunger Games off the top of my head, but the Magisterium series by Holly Black and Cassandra Clare is very similar to Harry Potter. They’re meant for middle-graders. School for Psychics by K.C Archer is an adult series that reminded me a bit of Harry Potter as well.

What is a bad writing habit you have? I have an unfortunate penchant for parenthesis. I use them way more than any one person ever should.

What is your favorite word? Exacerbate. There’s a story behind that, involving dragging someone into a bookstore to prove that it was, in fact, a real word. What’s more, I did this while on a date. My date is a glutton for punishment: he married me.

Are you a nerd, dork, or dweeb? Yes. Oh- I have to pick one? I’m most definitely a nerd, and I’m proud of it.

Vampires or faeries? Why? I like vampires in theory, but I can only think of three vampires I like: Lestat (of course), Armand, and Spike from the Buffy tv show. Faeries, on the other hand, have a broader range: they are rich in variety, from the mischievous to the regal, to the downright dangerous. There is a lot that can be done with them, and I love reading the origins behind the different variations.

Shapeshifters or angels? Why? I love skinwalkers and changelings, and I once played a were-jaguar in a D&D campaign, so that’s the answer right there.

Spirits or werewolves? Um…I guess I don’t really have a preference. I read more books with ghouls and ghosts than I do books with werewolves. I’ve noticed that werewolves mostly live in romance novels, and I am not a fan of that particular genre.

Zombies or vampires? Why? Vampires, of course. If I wanted to see a dead, shambling, drooling husk of a human, I’d just look into the mirror before I drink my coffee.

Love triangles or forbidden love? I don’t love love. In books, I mean. I prefer forbidden love to love triangles, I suppose. Just keep it buried under tons of fantasy violence, and I’m good to go.

Full-on romance books or action-filled books with a little romance? I’m pretty sure my answer to the question above also answers this one. Give me some background romance and I’m fine, but I find myself rolling my eyes if the romance takes center-stage.

Wowza, that was a long one! I’m not tagging anyone here, although I might nag a few people on Twitter. If you do it, please link back to me so I can see your answers.

My Life in Books Tag

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I saw this fantastic tag on Irresponsible Reader’s blog, which everyone should follow. Conveniently, I have it linked here. I don’t know who the original creator of this tag is: if you do, please let me know so I can give credit where credit is due.

Find a book for each of your initials:

W- We Ride the Storm by Devin Madson
We Ride the Storm (The Reborn Empire, #1) by Devin Madson

S- Soulforge by Margaret Weis
The Soulforge (Dragonlance: The Raistlin Chronicles, Book 1 ...

B– To Best the Boys by Mary Weber
Amazon.com: To Best the Boys (9780718080969): Weber, Mary: Books

Count your age along your bookshelf: What book do you land on?

It depends on which of my shelves I start on. It’s either The Seven and Half Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton, Oddmire: Changeling by William Ritter, The Devouring Gray by Christine Lynn Herman, or Story of the World Volume 4 (homeschool curriculum).

A book set in your city/country-

A Gathering of Saints by Robert Lindsey
A Gathering of Saints: Lindsey, Robert: 9781501153112: Amazon.com ...

I grew up in Salt Lake City, Utah. I love this fascinating nonfiction about the LDS church, forged religious documents, and other things that are too wild to be made up.

A book that represents a destination that you’d love to travel to-

Dubliners by James Joyce
Dubliners by James Joyce - Kindle edition by Joyce, James ...


A book that’s your favorite Color- 
My favorite colors are dark green and burgundy. I’m having a hard time thinking of a book with both colors on the cover.
The Annotated Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie, Maria Tatar, 9780393066005

Which book do you have the fondest memories of? I don’t have just one. I do remember racing to check out Saint George and the Dragon by Margaret Hodges, when I was young. Actually, this cover has close to  my favorite colors in it.
Saint George and the Dragon: Margaret Hodges, Trina Schart Hyman ...

Which book did you have the most difficulty reading? A Child Called It by David Pelzer is the most upsetting and brutal book I’ve ever read.
A Child Called It: One Child's Courage to Survive: Pelzer, Dave ...
Which book on your tbr will give you the most satisfaction to finish? I haven’t made it through E=MC2 by David Bodanis yet. I was struggling to understand it the last time I tried…one of these days I’ll make it through.
E=mc2: A Biography of the World's Most Famous Equation.: David ...

I’m not tagging anyone in particular, but I’d love to see what other people come up with.

The Stay at Home Book Tag

I have several book reviews waiting to be posted, but it’s been a hot minute since I’ve done a book tag, and this one is fun. I blame Books are 42 for having fabulous answers. This tag was created by Princess of Paperback. If you decide to do it as well, please link back to me so I don’t miss seeing your answers. Here goes:

Laying in Bed: A Book You Could/Have Read in a Day- The Rome of Fall by Chad Alan Gibbs

After Marcus Brinks left mysteriously two decades ago, financial ruin and his dying mother brought him back to his hometown of Rome, Alabama. Brinks, the former lead singer of ’90s indie-rock band Dear Brutus, takes a job teaching at his old school, where years ago, he and his friend, Jackson, conspired to get Deacon, the starting quarterback and resident school jerk, kicked off the football team.

Now it’s Jackson, head coach of Rome, who rules the school like Caesar, while Deacon plots his demise. This time Brinks refuses to get involved, opting instead for a quiet life with Becca, his high school crush. But will dreams of domestic black go up in flames when the repercussion of the past meet the lying, cheating, and blackmail of the present? (taken from Amazon)

This book is so much fun! I loved every nostalgia-filled moment. You can find my review here.

Snacking: A Guilty Pleasure Book- The Mortal Instruments series by Cassandra Clare

The reason I consider Cassandra Clare to be a guilty pleasure is that her books include everything that usually annoys the snot out of me: love triangles, angst-ridden teens, bad boys with hearts of gold…I could go on. So why do I love this series? Magnus.

Netflix: series you want to start- The Black Iron Legacy by Gareth Ryder-Hanrahan

Enter a city of saints and thieves . . .
The city of Guerdon stands eternal. A refuge from the war that rages beyond its borders. But in the ancient tunnels deep beneath its streets, a malevolent power has begun to stir.
The fate of the city rests in the hands of three thieves. They alone stand against the coming darkness. As conspiracies unfold and secrets are revealed, their friendship will be tested to the limit. If they fail, all will be lost, and the streets of Guerdon will run with blood.
The Gutter Prayer 
is an epic tale of sorcerers and thieves, treachery and revenge, from a remarkable new voice in fantasy. (taken from Amazon)

              The first book in this series is The Gutter Prayer. I’ve heard amazing things about it and I’m mad at myself for not having read it yet.

Deep Clean: a book that’s been on your “to be read” list for ages-  The Ghostwriter by Alessandra Torre

Four years ago, I lied. I stood in front of the police, my friends and family, and made up a story, my best one yet. And all of them believed me.

I wasn’t surprised. Telling stories is what made me famous. Fifteen bestsellers. Millions of fans. Fame and fortune.

Now, I have one last story to write. It’ll be my best one yet, with a jaw-dropping twist that will leave the nation stunned and gasping for breath.

They say that sticks and stones will break your bones, but this story? It will be the one that kills me. (taken from Amazon)

                       I’ve been wanting to read this book for the longest time. I just can’t find it when I’m physically at a bookstore and I don’t usually order books online. That’s changed recently, for obvious reasons, so hopefully I’ll get this one before too long.

Animal Crossing: a book you recently bought because of hype- I don’t usually buy books based on hype, but there are bookbloggers whose opinions I listen to. I bought High Fire based on The Irresponsible Reader’s recommendation. Have I read it yet? Um…

Productivity: A book you learned from, or that had an impact on you- Wishful Drinking by Carrie Fisher

In Wishful Drinking, Carrie Fisher tells the true and intoxicating story of her life with inimitable wit. Born to celebrity parents, she was picked to play a princess in a little movie called Star Wars when only 19 years old. “But it isn’t all sweetness and light sabers.”

Alas, aside from a demanding career and her role as a single mother (not to mention the hyperspace hairdo), Carrie also spends her free time battling addiction, weathering the wild ride of manic depression and lounging around various mental institutions. It’s an incredible tale – from having Elizabeth Taylor as a stepmother, to marrying (and divorcing) Paul Simon, from having the father of her daughter leave her for a man, to ultimately waking up one morning and finding a friend dead beside her in bed. (taken from Amazon)

Carrie Fisher was unapologetic and brave about her mental illness, which is something I aspire to. On tough days, this quote from Wishful Drinking is one I come to:

“One of the things that baffles me (and there are quite a few) is how there can be so much lingering stigma with regards to mental illness, specifically bipolar disorder. In my opinion, living with manic depression takes a tremendous amount of balls. Not unlike a tour of Afghanistan (though the bombs and bullets, in this case, come from the inside). At times, being bipolar can be an all-consuming challenge, requiring a lot of stamina and even more courage, so if you’re living with this illness and functioning at all, it’s something to be proud of, not ashamed of.
They should issue medals along with the steady stream of medication.”

Facetime: a book you were gifted-  A World Without Whom: The Essential Guide to Language in the Buzzfeed Age by Emmy J. Favilla 


A World Without “Whom” is Eats, Shoots & Leaves for the internet age, and BuzzFeed global copy chief Emmy Favilla is the witty go-to style guru of webspeak.

As language evolves faster than ever before, what is the future of “correct” writing? When Favilla was tasked with creating a style guide for BuzzFeed, she opted for spelling, grammar, and punctuation guidelines that would reflect not only the site’s lighthearted tone, but also how readers actually use language IRL.

With wry cleverness and an uncanny intuition for the possibilities of internet-age expression, Favilla makes a case for breaking the rules laid out by Strunk and White: A world without “whom,” she argues, is a world with more room for writing that’s clear, timely, pleasurable, and politically aware. Featuring priceless emoji strings, sidebars, quizzes, and style debates among the most lovable word nerds in the digital media world–of which Favilla is queen–A World Without “Whom” is essential for readers and writers of virtually everything: news articles, blog posts, tweets, texts, emails, and whatever comes next . . . so basically everyone. (taken from Amazon)

My husband gave this to me for Christmas. Since I’m hoping to one day join the world of book editing, this book (review found here)    was the perfect gift.

Self-care: what is one thing you’ve done recently to look after yourself- Um…I’m pretty low maintenance. Give me a half hour to read uninterrupted, and I’m good. I wouldn’t say no to some yummy coffee, though.

Bonus: name a book that is coming out soon-  The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton 

A murder on the high seas. A detective duo. A demon who may or may not exist.
It’s 1634 and Samuel Pipps, the world’s greatest detective, is being transported to Amsterdam to be executed for a crime he may, or may not, have committed. Travelling with him is his loyal bodyguard, Arent Hayes, who is determined to prove his friend innocent.

But no sooner are they out to sea than devilry begins to blight the voyage. A twice-dead leper stalks the decks. Strange symbols appear on the sails. Livestock is slaughtered.

And then three passengers are marked for death, including Samuel.

Could a demon be responsible for their misfortunes?

With Pipps imprisoned, only Arent can solve a mystery that connects every passenger onboard. A mystery that stretches back into their past and now threatens to sink the ship, killing everybody on board. (taken from Amazon)

It truly doesn’t matter to me what this book is about: I loved The Seven and a Half Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle so much that I’ll be excited to read anything by this author. That being said, the description sounds awesome. It won’t be out until much later in the year, but I’m incredibly excited.

 

Well, that’s it. I’m not tagging anyone here (although I might nag some people about it on Twitter), but I hope you take part. This one is fun!

 

 

 

The Perfect Book Tag

I was tagged in this fantastic post by The Orangutan Librarian. I’m not attempting to write a book, but I’ll give it a go. Huzzah for participation!

The Perfect Genre: pick a book that perfectly represents its genreImage result for the hobbit book

Of course, I’m going to go with fantasy. As much as I like many other genres, fantasy is always my favorite. I have to say The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien perfectly represents this genre. Tolkien’s world is fully realized, it has the hero’s quest, a great group of fascinating characters, and of course there’s Smaug. He’s the quintessential fantasy dragon.

The Perfect Setting: pick a book that takes place in a perfect place

Image result for the night circus book

I feel like I use The Night Circus in a lot of my posts, but I can’t help it. It’s so gorgeous. I’d love to wander through the Cirque de Reves. Anyone who hasn’t read this book, needs to add it to their (probably already overflowing) to be read pile.

The Perfect Main Character

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This question was really hard on me, because I usually don’t love the main characters in books. Because they are often used to further the story, I find myself getting annoyed by how shortsighted or flat-out stupid they can be. I do love Slowhand, though.

The Perfect Best Friend

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Charlie is so sweet and considerate. He takes the time to get to know all his friends’ quirks, their likes and dislikes. He’s loyal to a fault, and he has a loving heart.

The Perfect Love Interest: pick a character who you think would be the best romantic partner
I’ve got nothing. I am bereft of any sort of interest in bookish romances.

The Perfect Villain: pick the character with the most devious mind

Image result for the order of the phoenix book

Dolores Umbridge is absolutely vile. What makes her so incredibly disturbing, though, is that she’s firmly convinced she’s right. She thinks she’s justified in everything she does, and people like that are very, very dangerous.

The Perfect Family: pick the perfect bookish family

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I didn’t want to post Harry Potter twice in a row, but the Weasleys are the perfect literary family. They pretty much adopted Harry. Not because he was “the Chosen One”, but because they saw a kid who needed love. They’re boisterous, fun, a little bit chaotic, but loving and sweet.

The perfect animal or pet: pick a pet or fantastical animal that you need to see in a book

Image result for skie from dragonlance art by matt stawicki

(art by Matt Stawicki)

I’ll always choose dragons. I actually collect dragons. I have figurines, stuffed animals, even a stained glass window hanging. This particular dragon is a favorite of mine, featured in Dragonlance.

The perfect plot twist

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I loved every mind-bending moment of this book. Stuart Turton’s second novel, The Devil and the Dark Water will be coming out sometime next year. I have no idea what it’s about. I truly don’t care: I’ll still be in line to buy it as soon as it releases. His writing is astounding.

The Perfect Trope: pick a trope you’d add to your book without thinking

Does the whole “small group will goes on an epic journey” thing count as a trope? If so, then that’s the one I’d add without a second thought.

The Perfect Cover: pick a cover that you would easily put on your own book

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I love everything about this cover, from the gold-and-blue embossing, to the title. It has a mysterious, dark fairy tale feel to it that I can’t get enough of.

The Perfect Ending:

Image result for the ten thousand doors of january

I want to say The Night Circus again, but I’ll refrain. I love books that feel like they’re continuing on beyond the final page, and we can catch up with the characters years down the road and chat like old friends. Both Alix E. Harrow and Erin Morgenstern have captured that feeling perfectly in their novels.

So, there you have it. I’m not going to tag anyone here, although I might tag some people on Twitter. If you feel like participating, please do. I’d love to see what others think!

The End of the Year Book Tag

The end of the year is rapidly approaching. I’m not sure why 2019 decided to move at a gallop, but it seems that it did. I’ve seen this book tag on several blogs and I’m not sure where it originated. The credit for this great tag goes to Ariel Bissett. Without further ado, here are my answers to some questions that no one has asked:

Are There Any Books You’ve Started This Year That You Need To Finish?

Ruthless Gods (Something Dark and Holy #2) by Emily A. Duncan: I started this long before its release date, which is April 7th, 2020. I obviously have plenty of time to read and review it before the release date, so I’m not stressing it.

Image result for ruthless gods

Nadya doesn’t trust her magic anymore. Serefin is fighting off a voice in his head that doesn’t belong to him. Malachiasz is at war with who–and what–he’s become.

As their group is continually torn apart, the girl, the prince, and the monster find their fates irrevocably intertwined. They’re pieces on a board, being orchestrated by someone…or something. The voices that Serefin hears in the darkness, the ones that Nadya believes are her gods, the ones that Malachiasz is desperate to meet―those voices want a stake in the world, and they refuse to stay quiet any longer.

In her dramatic follow-up to Wicked Saints, the first book in her Something Dark and Holy trilogy, Emily A. Duncan paints a Gothic, icy world where shadows whisper, and no one is who they seem, with a shocking ending that will leave you breathless. (taken from Amazon)

Do You Have An Autumnal Book To Transfer Into The New Year?

Indeed, I do. I always reread the Dragonlance Chronicles by Margaret Weiss and Tracy Hickman in the fall. I’m enjoying it even more than usual this year, since I’m participating in Offthetbr’s readalong.

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Lifelong friends, they went their separate ways. Now they are together again, though each holds secrets from the others in his heart. They speak of a world shadowed with rumors of war. They speak of tales of strange monsters, creatures of myth, creatures of legend. They do not speak of their secrets. Not then. Not until a chance encounter with a beautiful, sorrowful woman, who bears a magical crystal staff, draws the companions deeper into the shadows, forever changing their lives and shaping the fate of the world.

No one expected them to be heroes.

Least of all, them. (taken from Amazon)
Is There A New Release You’re Still Waiting For?

Oddly enough, not really. My most anticipated new release just came out, so now I’m just enjoying discovering new books and rereading favorites.

What Are Three Books You Want To Read Before The End Of The Year?

The Audacity by Laura Loup: I’m starting this one soon, and I’m really excited to see where it goes.

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May’s humdrum life gets flung into hyperdrive when she’s abducted, but not all aliens are out to probe her. She’s inadvertently rescued by Xan who’s been orbiting Earth in a day-glo orange rocket ship, watching re-runs of “I Love Lucy”.

Seizing the opportunity for a better life, May learns how to race the Audacity and pilots her way into interstellar infamy. Finally, she has a job she likes and a friend to share her winnings with–until the Goddess of Chaos screws the whole thing up, and Xan’s unmentionable past makes a booty call. (taken from Amazon)
The Shadow of What Was Lost by James Islington: I love a good fantasy, and I think this book will deliver.

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As destiny calls, a journey begins.
It has been twenty years since the godlike Augurs were overthrown and killed. Now, those who once served them — the Gifted — are spared only because they have accepted the rebellion’s Four Tenets, vastly limiting their powers.
As a Gifted, Davian suffers the consequences of a war lost before he was even born. He and others like him are despised. But when Davian discovers he wields the forbidden power of the Augurs, he and his friends Wirr and Asha set into motion a chain of events that will change everything.

To the west, a young man whose fate is intertwined with Davian’s wakes up in the forest, covered in blood and with no memory of who he is…

And in the far north, an ancient enemy long thought defeated begins to stir. (taken from Amazon)

The Jackal of Nar by John Marco: My husband recommended this book, and he has excellent taste in fantasy books.

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His enemies call Prince Richius “the Jackal,” but he is merely a reluctant warrior for the Emperor in the fight for the strife-ridden borderland of Lucel-Lor. And though the empire’s war machines are deadly, when the leader of a fanatical sect sweeps the battlefield with potent magic, Richius’s forces are routed. He returns home defeated—but the Emperor will not accept the loss. Soon Richius is given one last chance to pit the empire’s science against the enemy’s devastating magic, and this time he fights for more than a ruler’s mad whim. This time Richius has his own obsessive quest—and where he hesitated to go for an emperor’s greed, for love he will plunge headlong into the grasp of the deadliest enemy he has ever encountered. . . .(taken from Amazon)

Is There A Book You Think Could Shock You And Become Your Favorite Book Of The Year?

I’m a big fan of surprise masterpieces, so I go into each book I read with an open mind and hope that it will be one I enjoy. It has been a year full of amazing books, and I know that I’ve only begun to discover all the incredible voices out there.

Have You Already Started Making Reading Plans For 2020?

I can’t even plan an outfit! I do have some ARCs that will be released in 2020, so my goal right now is to have them all read and reviewed before their release date. Other than that, my plan is to maybe remember to put eyeliner on both eyes if I’m going to put makeup on before leaving the house.

If you want to participate, feel free! This is a fun one.

Quick Fire Fantasy Book Tag

Irresponsiblereader had this awesome tag on his blog today. You know I never miss a chance to talk about fantasy books, so I’m taking part.

Rules:

  • Thank the person who tagged you and link back to their post
  • Link to the creator’s blog (thebookwormdreamer.wordpress.com) in your post
  • Answer the prompts below – all fantasy books!
  • Tag 5 others to take part

Enjoy!

5 Star Read: The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

See, here’s the weird thing: I really, really don’t like the sequel to this book. The first book is so amazing, though, that it doesn’t matter. I fell in love with The Name of the Wind from the very beginning, when I read about the silence of three parts. Read it below, and you’ll see why:

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“The Waystone Inn lay in silence, and it was a silence of three parts.

The most obvious part was a hollow, echoing quiet, made by things that were lacking. If there had been a wind, it would have sighed through the trees, set the inn’s sign swinging on its hooks, and brushed the silence down the road like trailing autumn leaves. If there had been a crowd, even a handful of men inside the inn, they would have filled the silence with conversation and laughter, the clatter and clamor one expects from a drinking house during the dark hours of the night. If there had been music…but no, of course there was no music. In fact, there were none of these things, and so the silence remained.

Inside the Waystone a pair of men huddled at one corner of the bar. They drank with quiet determination, avoiding serious discussions of troubling news. In doing these they added a small, sullen silence to the larger, hollow one. it made an alloy of sorts, a counterpoint.

The third silence was not an easy thing to notice. If you listened for an hour, you might begin to feel it in the wooden floor underfoot and in the rough, splintering barrels behind the bar. It was in the weight of the black stone hearth that held the heat of a long-dead fire. It was in the slow back and forth of a white linen cloth rubbing along the grain of the bar. And it was in the hands of the man who stood there, polishing a stretch of mahogany that already gleamed in the lamplight.

The man had true-red hair, red as flame. his eyes was dark and distant, and he moved with the subtle certainty that comes from knowing many things.

The Waystone was His, just as the third silence was his. This was appropriate, as it was the greatest silence of the three, wrapping the other inside itself. It was deep and wide as autumn’s ending. It was heavy as a great river-smooth stone. It was the patient, cut-flower sound of a man who is waiting to die.”

Always going to recommend: The Dragonlance Chronicles by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman

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Yup, these books keep showing up on my blog. I’m sure I’m annoying the gravy out of everyone who reads my posts, but I’ll unapologetically tout them as often as I can squeeze them in. They’re my favorite fantasy books, after all. If you want to read my loving rant about them, you can find it here.

Own it but haven’t read it yet: The Shadow of What Was Lost by (The Licanius Trilogy #1) by James Islington

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I’m really looking forward to this one. Here’s the Amazon description:

As destiny calls, a journey begins.
It has been twenty years since the godlike Augurs were overthrown and killed. Now, those who once served them — the Gifted — are spared only because they have accepted the rebellion’s Four Tenets, vastly limiting their powers.
As a Gifted, Davian suffers the consequences of a war lost before he was even born. He and others like him are despised. But when Davian discovers he wields the forbidden power of the Augurs, he and his friends Wirr and Asha set into motion a chain of events that will change everything.

To the west, a young man whose fate is intertwined with Davian’s wakes up in the forest, covered in blood and with no memory of who he is…

And in the far north, an ancient enemy long thought defeated begins to stir. (taken from Amazon)

Would read again:  Chronicles of the Black Company by Glen Cook

It’s been quite a while since I’ve read this series. It’s dark, gritty, and absolutely wonderful. I highly recommend it.

In another world: Black Sun Rising by C.S. Friedman

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This excellent book is about a priest and an evil sorcerer who must work together to defeat an evil that threatens everyone on their world. That’s a bare bones description: there’s much more to this fascinating book that I think that every fantasy lover should read.

Back on earth: Night Watch by Sergei Lukyanenko

This book is kind of odd, but in a fantastic way. Put healers, vampires, shape-shifters, magicians all in one place, and it gets a little frenetic. It’s great!

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So, there you have it. I might tag a few people via Twitter, but if you want to take part, please do so! I love reading more fantasy suggestions.

Finally Fall Book Tag

I saw this fabulous tag on beforewegoblog. Where I live currently, the seasons are: Hot, Hotter, Too Hot for Satan, and Hurricane Season. I did grow up in a place that had gorgeous Autumn, though, so I’ll be thinking of that as I write this post.

In Fall, the air is crisp and clear. Name a book with a vivid setting. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern.

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When a book can evoke not only sights and sounds, but smells, that’s a sign that the author is freaking incredible. Erin Morgenstern’s second novel (not related to The Night Circus) releases in a few weeks, and I’m beyond excited. If you haven’t read this book yet, read it now. Right. Now.

Nature is beautiful…but also dying. Name a book that is beautifully written, but also deals with a heavy topic, like loss or grief. If You Feel Too Much: Thoughts on Things Found and Lost and Hoped For by Jamie Tworkowski

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Poetry, letters, and short musings by the founder of To Write Love on Her Arms, this book deals with depression, suicide, and addiction, among other things. It’s beautiful and sad, with an underlying theme of hope for a better tomorrow.

Fall is Back to School Season. Name a Nonfiction Book that Taught You Something. Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness by Susannah Cahalan

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This book is about Susannah’s ordeal as she struggled to get an incredibly rare disease diagnosed and treated. It’s fascinating.

In order to keep warm, it’s good to spend some time with the people we love. Name a fictional family/household/friend-group that you’d love to be a part of. The Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

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Sorry, Beth. I have to steal your answer. I’d love to be a part of the Weasley’s chaotic, sweet household. Even Percy, once he stops being a twit, adds something and Mrs. Weasley has the kindest heart for everyone (unless you screw with her kids, of course.)

The colorful leaves are piling up on the ground. Show us a pile of Autumn-colored spines. 

I am a horrible photographer. Like, really, really horrible. But, here ya go!

Fall is the perfect time for some storytelling by the fireside. Share a book wherein somebody is telling a story.  The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow

Image result for the ten thousand doors of januaryOnce again, I’m borrowing one of Beth’s answers, but only because I really loved this book. I love books that have stories being told in them anyway, and this one is incredible.

The nights are getting darker. Share a dark, creepy read. Imaginary Friend by Stephen Chbosky

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This book rates high on my creep-o-meter. If you want an eerie book, this one’s for you.

The days are getting colder. Name a short, heartwarming read that could warm up somebody’s cold and rainy day. All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot

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I like animals, but I’m not automatically head-over-heels in love with everything with fur or feathers. This book, however, is like a hug between pages. It’s wonderful.

Fall returns every year. Name an old favorite that you’d like to return to soon. Dragons of Autumn Twilight by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman.

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I reread these every year around this time. I can’t wait to dive back in!

As usual, I’m not tagging anyone here, although I might tag a few people on Twitter. Take part if you like. I’d love to read more answers. Happy Fall!

Universal Monsters Book Tag

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I don’t really make book tags because creativity and I are often on the outs, but I thought a book tag revolving around classic movie monsters could be fun, so I’m giving it a go!

Dracula- a book with a charismatic villain:

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The Vampire Lestat by Anne Rice. I defy you to think of a more likable villain. Lestat is a vicious killer…but he’s also incredibly charismatic.

The Invisible Man: A book that has more going on than meets the eye-

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The Seven and a Half Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton has layers upon layers to peel back before getting to the heart of the mystery. It’s fantastic and one of the best books I’ve read.

Wolf-Man: A complicated character-

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The Dragonlance Chronicles by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman has Raistlin, one of the most flawed and multifaceted characters I’ve ever had the extreme pleasure to read.

Frankenstein: A book with a misunderstood character-

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The Three Dark Crowns series by Kendare Blake contains several misunderstood characters, but the one that immediately came to mind is Katharine. Incidentally, she’s also my favorite.

The Bride of Frankenstein: A sequel you enjoyed more than the first book

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The Curse of the Pharaohs by Elizabeth Peters is a fantastic sequel. I love the first Amelia Peabody book (The Crocodile on the Sandbank), but this book jumps right into things without needing to concentrate as much on character introductions, which is nice.

Creature from the Black Lagoon: An incredibly unique book-

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Universe Awakening (Redux Edition) by D. Ellis Overttun is one of the most creative and unique books I’ve read in recent memory.

The Mummy: A book that wraps up nicely (see what I did there?)-

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The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow. The ending of the book, like the rest of it, was pretty darn perfect.

I’m not tagging anyone, but please feel free to do your own and link me so I can see your answers. Happy Halloween!