Storytellers on Tour Blog Tour: Duckett and Dyer: Dicks for Hire by G.M. Nair

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I’m going to pull a fast one: I’ve already read (and loved) Duckett and Dyer: Dicks for Hire, so I’m going to review the second book in this series, Duckett and Dyer: The One-Hundred Percent Solution. Thank you to Storytellers on Tour for the opportunity to join in and rave about these books.

There might be some slight spoilers for Duckett and Dyer: Dicks for Hire in this review. Honestly, the books are so deliciously bizarre that you wouldn’t believe me if I gave you a play-by-play, although I’ll refrain. If you haven’t read the first book, you can find my review here).

Duckett and Dyer: The One-Hundred Percent Solution picks up pretty much right after the events of book one. After hopping through multiple universes, each one weirder than the last, life has returned to semi-normalcy for both Michael Duckett and Stephanie Dyer. Stephanie is attempting to ruin her detective business (totally on-brand for her), and Michael is working a soul-sucking job. There are a few changes, though: Michael has vowed to be a better friend to Stephanie. Stephanie, after a heart-to-heart with a future self, has made it her mission to protect Michael from any possible harm.

Unfortunately, Stephanie’s mission to destroy her own detective agency comes at a very bad time: Michael gets fired from his job. Fortunately, the detective duo finds themselves with something new to detect. They only get weird cases, and this one proves to be no exception.

The main characters are delightful. Michael has turned eye-rolling and long-suffering sighs into a fine art, and Stephanie is a walking Murphy’s Law. Of course there are many other fine characters, including an Illuminatist and an octopus-wearing cult member. It all makes sense in a zany sort of way.

The problem with this book is that it’s too freaking funny. I was forced to ignore any and all responsibilities to laugh my way through. It’s a real problem, I tell you. Also, I guffawed too loudly, almost spit my coffee across the room, and subjected my poor husband to snippets of the book without giving any context. Basically, this book turned me into an obnoxious jerk. I loved it.

Read this series.

Duckett & Dyer: Dicks For Hire - Kindle edition by Nair, G.M. ...

The Netflix Book Tag

I saw this great tag on Reader Gal’s blog. Her blog is awesome, so make sure to check it out. Original credit for this tag goes to A Book Lovers Playlist. Since we all sometimes put our books on hold to binge a show on Netflix, I think this makes for a fun tag. Here goes nothing:Recently Finished- the last book you finishedIt was either Venators: Magic Unleashed by Devri Walls or Hollow Men by Todd Sullivan (my review). I actually think I finished them both on the same day. I really need to make more of an effort to mark my books “read” on Goodreads the day I finish them.Top Picks- A book that was recommended to you based on books you have previously readDreyer’s English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style was suggested to me by Irresponsible Reader (follow his blog!) based on my review of A World Without “Whom”: The Essential Guide to Language in the Buzzfeed Age (review here).Recently Added- the last book you boughtI grabbed The Library of the Unwritten, which I’m dying to read. Have I started it yet? Um…Popular on Netflix- Books that everyone knows about (2 you’ve read and 2 you have no interest in )I read and loved both The Ten Thousand Doors of January and Daisy Jones and the Six. I think both of those are ubiquitous at this point. I have absolutely no interest in The Gilded Wolves or Gideon the Ninth.Comedies- a funny bookFowl Language: Winging It had me in stitches. That little duck really understands parenting.Dramas- a character who is a drama king/queenCity of Bones. Both Clary and Jace rate pretty stinking high on the drama-o-meter.Animated- a book with cartoons on the coverI’m not sure if this counts, but I’m going with Thornhill (click on book name to get review).Watch It Again- a book/series you want to rereadI reread both The Night Circus and The Dragonlance Chronicles every year.Documentaries- a non-fiction book you’d recommend to everyoneI loved For the Love of Books: Stories of Literary Lives, Banned Books, Author Feuds, Extraordinary Characters, and More . Okay, the name is a bit much. Actually, it’s way too much. The book is excellent, though.Action and Adventure- and action-packed bookKings of the Wyld is chock-full of action. It also has amazing writing, and a sense of fun that it seems a lot of fantasy has been missing lately. I highly recommend it.Well, there it is. What do you think of my answers? I’m not going to tag anyone here, but I’ll probably bug a few people on Twitter. Ha ha! If you do participate, please tag me,so I can see your answers.

A World Without “Whom”: The Essential Guide to Language in the BuzzFeed Age by Emmy J. Favilla

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As language evolves faster than ever before, what is the future of “correct” writing? When Favilla was tasked with creating a style guide for BuzzFeed, she opted for spelling, grammar, and punctuation guidelines that would reflect not only the site’s lighthearted tone, but also how readers actually use language IRL.

With wry cleverness and an uncanny intuition for the possibilities of internet-age expression, Favilla makes a case for breaking the rules laid out by Strunk and White: A world without “whom,” she argues, is a world with more room for writing that’s clear, timely, pleasurable, and politically aware. Featuring priceless emoji strings, sidebars, quizzes, and style debates among the most lovable word nerds in the digital media world–of which Favilla is queen–A World Without “Whom” is essential for readers and writers of virtually everything: news articles, blog posts, tweets, texts, emails, and whatever comes next . . . so basically everyone. (take from Amazon)

This book is funny and smart. It’s also a bit snarky, which I loved. My husband gave this book to me for Christmas, knowing my penchant for good grammar, as opposed to “online gunk.” I’m beginning to realize that this “online gunk” also has its place.

For example, according to this book, I’m a perfectivist who wants to be a descriptivist. Basically, I write the way I speak. However, the way I speak is pretty antiquated. I loved the little asides on “OK/ok/okay” (for the record, I’ve always used “okay”), as well as the reasoning behind changes in the rules.

As someone who had to have the meaning of “rofl” explained, realizing that there’s more to writing than grammar rules and the oxford comma (gulp!) is both cringe-worthy and interesting. Being that I’m currently working toward eventually going into book editing, this book will be a valuable asset. I loved this book, and I know I’ll come back to it again and again.

I highly recommend this.

It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas: Adult Fiction Edition

I’m back with my final post of books that would make great gifts. I’ve already written posts suggesting gifts for picture book readers, middle-grade, YA, and adult nonfiction. If you’re interested in reading those posts, I’ll put the links at the bottom. Here are five suggestions for adult readers:
The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow

This prose in this book is gorgeous. I’d recommend this to anyone who appreciates good writing with a sense of wonder liberally thrown in. It’s easily one of the best books I’ve read in a very long time.

Kings of the Wyld by Nicholas Eames

Holy guacamole, this book is fantastic! There’s heart (and gore, of course). It’s fun and engrossing. Any fantasy reader will love this book.

Duckett and Dyer: Dicks for Hire by G.M Nair

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This book is flat-out hilarious. I buddy read this one with Beth at beforewego (read her excellent review here) and we both loved it.

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern

This was my most anticipated new release of the year. It did not disappoint. The writing is exquisite. It will suck the reader in and leave them breathless.

Master of Sorrows by Justin Call

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Last but most certainly not least, I loved every moment of this book. It had a bit of a Name of the Wind vibe and belongs on the shelf among greats like Tolkien.

So, there you have it. These books would be great gifts. Have you read any of these? Are you planning on giving them to anyone?

Links:

It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas: Adult Nonfiction

It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas: YA Books

It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas: Middle-grade Books

It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas: Picture Books

The Audacity by Laura Loup

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Rocket racing can be deadly, but working in food service is worse.

May’s humdrum life is flung into hyperdrive when she’s abducted, but not all aliens are out to probe her. She’s inadvertently rescued by Xan, an “I Love Lucy” obsessed alien with the orangest rocket ship in the universe.

But you still have to eat in space, and rocket racing is a quick, if life-threatening, way to make a living.

Finally, May has a career she loves and a friend to share her winnings with. Until a Chaos goddess possessing Xan’s ex decides to start a cult on Earth and threatens to turn the planet into her den of destruction. The Audacity is the only ship fast enough to stop her, but May’s no hero. She doesn’t even particularly like Earth.

Are we screwed? (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to the author for giving me this book in exchange for my honest opinion. This is available now.

With a tagline like “Where rocket ships run on coffee and dumb luck,” how could I not fall in love with this book? Poor May works (slaves?) at a convenience store- until she is beamed up into a spaceship, launching her on an intergalactic adventure.

This book was absolutely bonkers, in the best way. I loved the witty humor, especially when the narration would include the reader briefly. When Xan’s ship was described as something from the BBC, I laughed out loud. I’m a big fan of tongue-in-cheek humor, and this book had it in abundance.

Xan, by the way, is hands-down the best alien ever created. There’s something endearing about him. His I Love Lucy obsession, and his oddball taste, made him a blast to read.  May reminded me of Dante from the movie Clerks (“I wasn’t even supposed to be here today”), which made me laugh.

This book is light-years ahead of many others, in terms of comedy. The prose is quippy without being over-the-top, the characters are fun and different. It’s funny without trying too hard to be, if that makes sense.

Basically, this book is a blast to read, and I highly recommend it. If you want a good belly-laugh, this book is for you.

The End of the Year Book Tag

The end of the year is rapidly approaching. I’m not sure why 2019 decided to move at a gallop, but it seems that it did. I’ve seen this book tag on several blogs and I’m not sure where it originated. The credit for this great tag goes to Ariel Bissett. Without further ado, here are my answers to some questions that no one has asked:

Are There Any Books You’ve Started This Year That You Need To Finish?

Ruthless Gods (Something Dark and Holy #2) by Emily A. Duncan: I started this long before its release date, which is April 7th, 2020. I obviously have plenty of time to read and review it before the release date, so I’m not stressing it.

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Nadya doesn’t trust her magic anymore. Serefin is fighting off a voice in his head that doesn’t belong to him. Malachiasz is at war with who–and what–he’s become.

As their group is continually torn apart, the girl, the prince, and the monster find their fates irrevocably intertwined. They’re pieces on a board, being orchestrated by someone…or something. The voices that Serefin hears in the darkness, the ones that Nadya believes are her gods, the ones that Malachiasz is desperate to meet―those voices want a stake in the world, and they refuse to stay quiet any longer.

In her dramatic follow-up to Wicked Saints, the first book in her Something Dark and Holy trilogy, Emily A. Duncan paints a Gothic, icy world where shadows whisper, and no one is who they seem, with a shocking ending that will leave you breathless. (taken from Amazon)

Do You Have An Autumnal Book To Transfer Into The New Year?

Indeed, I do. I always reread the Dragonlance Chronicles by Margaret Weiss and Tracy Hickman in the fall. I’m enjoying it even more than usual this year, since I’m participating in Offthetbr’s readalong.

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Lifelong friends, they went their separate ways. Now they are together again, though each holds secrets from the others in his heart. They speak of a world shadowed with rumors of war. They speak of tales of strange monsters, creatures of myth, creatures of legend. They do not speak of their secrets. Not then. Not until a chance encounter with a beautiful, sorrowful woman, who bears a magical crystal staff, draws the companions deeper into the shadows, forever changing their lives and shaping the fate of the world.

No one expected them to be heroes.

Least of all, them. (taken from Amazon)
Is There A New Release You’re Still Waiting For?

Oddly enough, not really. My most anticipated new release just came out, so now I’m just enjoying discovering new books and rereading favorites.

What Are Three Books You Want To Read Before The End Of The Year?

The Audacity by Laura Loup: I’m starting this one soon, and I’m really excited to see where it goes.

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May’s humdrum life gets flung into hyperdrive when she’s abducted, but not all aliens are out to probe her. She’s inadvertently rescued by Xan who’s been orbiting Earth in a day-glo orange rocket ship, watching re-runs of “I Love Lucy”.

Seizing the opportunity for a better life, May learns how to race the Audacity and pilots her way into interstellar infamy. Finally, she has a job she likes and a friend to share her winnings with–until the Goddess of Chaos screws the whole thing up, and Xan’s unmentionable past makes a booty call. (taken from Amazon)
The Shadow of What Was Lost by James Islington: I love a good fantasy, and I think this book will deliver.

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As destiny calls, a journey begins.
It has been twenty years since the godlike Augurs were overthrown and killed. Now, those who once served them — the Gifted — are spared only because they have accepted the rebellion’s Four Tenets, vastly limiting their powers.
As a Gifted, Davian suffers the consequences of a war lost before he was even born. He and others like him are despised. But when Davian discovers he wields the forbidden power of the Augurs, he and his friends Wirr and Asha set into motion a chain of events that will change everything.

To the west, a young man whose fate is intertwined with Davian’s wakes up in the forest, covered in blood and with no memory of who he is…

And in the far north, an ancient enemy long thought defeated begins to stir. (taken from Amazon)

The Jackal of Nar by John Marco: My husband recommended this book, and he has excellent taste in fantasy books.

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His enemies call Prince Richius “the Jackal,” but he is merely a reluctant warrior for the Emperor in the fight for the strife-ridden borderland of Lucel-Lor. And though the empire’s war machines are deadly, when the leader of a fanatical sect sweeps the battlefield with potent magic, Richius’s forces are routed. He returns home defeated—but the Emperor will not accept the loss. Soon Richius is given one last chance to pit the empire’s science against the enemy’s devastating magic, and this time he fights for more than a ruler’s mad whim. This time Richius has his own obsessive quest—and where he hesitated to go for an emperor’s greed, for love he will plunge headlong into the grasp of the deadliest enemy he has ever encountered. . . .(taken from Amazon)

Is There A Book You Think Could Shock You And Become Your Favorite Book Of The Year?

I’m a big fan of surprise masterpieces, so I go into each book I read with an open mind and hope that it will be one I enjoy. It has been a year full of amazing books, and I know that I’ve only begun to discover all the incredible voices out there.

Have You Already Started Making Reading Plans For 2020?

I can’t even plan an outfit! I do have some ARCs that will be released in 2020, so my goal right now is to have them all read and reviewed before their release date. Other than that, my plan is to maybe remember to put eyeliner on both eyes if I’m going to put makeup on before leaving the house.

If you want to participate, feel free! This is a fun one.

I am Scary by Elise Gravel- ARC Review

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In this sweet little book, a monster tries to scare a young child. But the child insists the monster is not scary but actually quite huggable. (taken from Amazon)

                                  Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. It will be available on March 17, 202

This book is so adorable! I requested it because I had a feeling my toddler would enjoy it. I read it aloud and he loved it.

The illustrations are charming in their simplicity. Told with very little dialogue, this book is about a monster who tries- and fails- to scare a child. He roars, growls, and shows off his horns and teeth. To the monster’s discomfiture, the child thinks he’s cute. What’s a monster to do?

What I liked best about this book was the ability to prompt my toddler to talk about the pictures and make conclusions based on what was happening. Because there isn’t much dialogue, my “little” made the monster sounds, talked about how cute the monster was, and had a lovely time. The book would probably be even more riveting to a slightly younger child, but my toddler still really liked it.

This would make a great baby shower gift. I recommend it for all little book lovers- in-training.

The Death of Mungo Blackwell by Lauren H. Brandenburg- ARC Review

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‘We all need to know what’s missing in our lives. At a funeral someone stands and describes everything a person has accomplished in their life. But what if they missed something? What if there was one thing they never got to do? And what if they had a chance to go back and do it?’ The Blackwells are a family with an extraordinary history and astounding traditions, which include attending their own funerals before they die! Their ways are questionable and their stories about deceased relatives are as bold as their red hair, but it is their eclectic wares that keep tourists coming back to their market in the town of Coraloo. Charlie Price, whose world has come crumbling down after a lapse in judgement leaves him unemployed, finds himself flung into the chaotic world of the Blackwells when he relocates to Coraloo with his socialite wife, Velveteen, and shy son, Gideon. Here Charlie attempts to make a living as a ‘picker’, reselling under-priced items he picks up at the market. Some of the Blackwells welcome him with open arms, but others resent pickers and want him thrown out of the market. Charlie soon finds this new way of life under threat and his quest for simplicity seems to be crumbling. Perhaps it’s time for Charlie to have a funeral of his own! This charming story of hope will warm your heart and make your imagination soar. (taken from Netgalley)

Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. This book is available for purchase now.

Peculiar, but highly entertaining, this is one that I’d file under “cozy books”.” After an incident involving a food truck leaves Charlie Price jobless, he moves to small Coraloo with his wife and son. They find themselves thrown in the middle of a feud between two old families: the Tofts and the Blackwells.

What originally drew me to the book was the part of the description that mentions the Blackwells attending their own funerals before they die. It sounded like a fun, quirky read. However, the funeral isn’t actually the focal point, or the thing that stuck with me. This book is full of small-town eccentricities and charm to spare. It’s not a trite book, though; it found a sweet, quiet way of talking about stress, adjusting to new and scary circumstances, and “blooming where you’re planted.”

Equally funny and touching, this book managed to warm my cold little heart. I highly recommend it.

Pussycat Palace by Clive Lilwall

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Pussycat Palace is an Animal Farm-like satire on a recent event in American politics.

The incidents are strangely similar to those of the 2016 US Presidential Election involving Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

The members of a feral cat colony in Louisiana vote for a new leader. All hell breaks loose when Ace, a hefty outspoken ginger tomcat, fights for supremacy against Catty, a crafty female tabby.

Fake news happens! The influx of immigrant cats into the colony, the roles of males and females, sexual issues and defense against enemies are key election topics.

And the results are just as unbelievable as Trump vs. Clinton in 2016! (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. It’s available for purchase now.

Sardonic and on-the-nose, this book managed to capture the jaw-dropping events of 2016 perfectly. Fyodor was a perfect window into the “election” of the next leader in a cat colony in Louisiana. Watching the lengths these cats went to in order to gain their version of supremacy was eerily familiar to me.

It was told in a simplistic, matter-of-fact style that I found charming. In no way was it pretentious or preachy. Parts of it reminded me of a lighthearted Watership Down. I love that book, so that’s high praise.

I don’t talk politics on my blog as a general rule, but I will say this: if you are a Trump supporter, or lacking in a tongue-in-cheek sense of humor, this book isn’t going to make you happy. Personally, I loved the book.

Sometimes things get to be so unbelievable that it’s ripe for a good parody, which is what happened in this case. This was a good read.

Bunnicula by Deborah and James Howe

It wouldn’t be October if I didn’t talk about Bunnicula. This was one of my favorites growing up, and I’ve passed the enjoyment down to my oldest. I’m looking forward to the day when my youngest reads them too.

Bunnicula: A Rabbit Tale of Mystery is an easy chapter book. It’s told from the point of view of Harold, a pet dog. He’s shaggy, lovable, and rather gullible. He lives with his family, the Monroes, and a well-read cat named Chester. One night the Monroes go to a late-night showing of Dracula and bring home a surprise: a rabbit they name Bunnicula. Chester is convinced that Bunnicula is a vampire, sucking the juice from vegetables, and that only he can save the world from the evil machinations of the vampire bunny.

This series, of which Bunnicula is the first, is very special to me. I read it with my sister when we were younger and it was a wonderful way for us to bond. We’re still very close to this day, and we talk about those Bunnicula books from time to time.

This book is hilarious. I have no idea how the authors managed to come up with so many funny situations, but it had me in stitches when I read it, and my son reacted the same way when he read it. He’s reread the entire series several times, and will probably read them again this month.

This book is perfect for reading aloud (maybe a chapter or two a day?), or for readers just gaining confidence in their skills. My oldest and I took turns reading pages aloud the first time he experienced Bunnicula. It is one of my favorite memories. There are illustrations every few pages, but they are few enough that children are required to paint the pictures in their minds. I highly recommend this book, and October is the perfect time for a not-spooky “spooky” read. Enjoy!