The Disaster Artist: My Life Inside The Room, the Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made by Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell

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This is one of those many books that I decided I wanted to read…then never got around to. I finally did, but only after seeing the movie  by the same name. I rarely read a book after seeing the movie (I prefer to do it the other way around), but the movie was so well done, I was dying to read the book and compare. My wonderful husband kindly let me read his copy while he was also reading it.

The book did not disappoint. It’s about Tommy Wiseau, the writer, director, producer, and star of the cult classic movie The Room. I haven’t seen The Room, and I probably never will. Based on the few clips I’ve seen, it’s embarrassingly terrible. That’s what makes The Disaster Artist so compelling. As much of a train wreck as the movie was, it’s become a phenomenon. And Tommy Wiseau is fascinating. Despite having some serious scumbag moments, I couldn’t help but like him. He’s an incredibly private person, and there are so many mysteries to unravel. Where is he really from? How on earth does he have so much money to throw away on a passion project? How old is he actually?

Another interesting thing is the unlikely relationship between Greg Sestero, the co-author, and Tommy. It’s engrossing. One difference between The Disaster Artist book, and the movie by the same name, is that Dave Franco portrays Greg as a naive, kind, boy-next-door character. In the book, Greg came across as manipulative, self-centered, and lazy. I wonder if he’s aware that he seems that way.

This book will stay with you long after you finish it. I ended up looking up acting clips of the real Tommy Wiseau, searching to see what the main characters are doing now, and basically dissecting the entire thing over and over in my mind.

The verdict: Read this book! Put it on top of your “to be read” pile! Once you’ve read it, see the movie with James and Dave Franco. Tell me in the comments what your thoughts are. I would love to discuss this book!

One Day: The Extraordinary Story of an Ordinary 24 Hours in America by Gene Weingarten- ARC Review

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On New Year’s Day 2013, two-time Pulitzer Prize–winner Gene Weingarten asked three strangers to, literally, pluck a day, month, and year from a hat. That day—chosen completely at random—turned out to be Sunday, December 28, 1986, by any conventional measure a most ordinary day. Weingarten spent the next six years proving that there is no such thing.

That Sunday between Christmas and New Year’s turned out to be filled with comedy, tragedy, implausible irony, cosmic comeuppances, kindness, cruelty, heroism, cowardice, genius, idiocy, prejudice, selflessness, coincidence, and startling moments of human connection, along with evocative foreshadowing of momentous events yet to come. Lives were lost. Lives were saved. Lives were altered in overwhelming ways. Many of these events never made it into the news; they were private dramas in the lives of private people. They were utterly compelling.
 
One Day asks and answers the question of whether there is even such a thing as “ordinary” when we are talking about how we all lurch and stumble our way through the daily, daunting challenge of being human. (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. It will be available on October 22nd.

I was immediately drawn to the idea of this book. I love things that remind us that, although the world is big, we are all part of it and we affect each other’s lives- often in ways we never even know about. When it comes right down to it, the world isn’t as big as it often seems. We all love, fear, grieve, and hope. This books is an excellent reminder of that.

At the beginning of the book, the author lamented the day that was picked. It was during what is normally a slow news week, and nothing of note was known to have happened on that day. However, as this book proved, there is no such thing as an unimportant day.

This isn’t a light read. It will make you think. It will make you question every interaction you’ve had during the day. Was that smile you gave a stranger what gave them the courage to call a suicide help-line? How do “insignificant moments” affect lives down the road? We will never know what’s going on with others around us behind closed doors, what people keep private, but we aren’t islands. This book was a reminder of that.

The writing was superb, the lengths the author went to in order to get first- hand accounts was astonishing, and the book was wonderful. This would make a great Christmas gift. While you’re at it, pick up a copy for yourself.

2019 Mid-year check-in

It’s been a pretty dang good reading year so far. Sure, there have been some less than satisfactory reads, but those have been few and far between. Being a newbie blogger (less than a year old), I’m still getting into my groove, but a mid-year post sounds fun and encouraging. So, without further ado, here goes:

According to the lovely Goodreads page, I’ve finished sixty nine books so far this year. I haven’t been counting books I read to my kids, or anything I’ve read for school, but it’s a pretty accurate count of my “me time” progress.

I’ve seen other posts listing top three books read, or even one favorite, but I don’t think I can possibly pick just one. Instead, I’m listing my top reads below, complete with links to any posts I’ve written. These are not in any particular order.

Duckett and Dyer: Dicks for Hire by Ganesh Nair: blog post forthcoming.

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The Unlikely Escape of Uriah Heep by H.G. Parr: you can find my blog post here.

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Two Like Me and You by Chad Alan Gibb: You can read my glowing review here.

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Wicked Saints by Emily A. Duncan: I waxed enthusiastic about this book. You can read my post here.

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Imaginary Friend by Stephen Chbosky: Read the many wonderful things about this book here.

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For the Love of Books: Stories of Literary Lives, Banned Books, Author Feuds Extraordinary Characters, and More by Graham Tarrant: The only thing I didn’t love about this book is its name. Read my review here.

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Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid: This book has shown up on many lists of favorites I’ve seen, for good reason. Here is one more glowing review.

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Changeling (the Oddmire Book 1) by William Ritter: This book is fantastic and I loved every minute of it. Read why here

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The Return of King Lillian by Suzie Plakson: The one is wonderful! Its release date is next Tuesday and I highly recommend it. Read my review here.

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The Twisted Tree by Rachel Burge: This was a fun, spooky book. Check out my blog post here.

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There are several other books I’m looking forward to reading this year, not to mention any unexpected treasures that I’m sure to meet. Happy reading!

Food, Culture, Latin America by Matt Simkin


A love for food and travel, but riddled with apathy from a mundane routine; surely there’s a way to be happier and combine the things you love in life?

The dull working life inspired this enticing travelogue on how food and culture influence the varied regions across Latin America with a backpacker’s voice. Travelling from Mexico down to Patagonia in Argentina, Simkin takes a profound look into the Latino culture with enthusiasm and pragmatism. Stepping away from the gringo trail and exploring everything from islands to jungles, mountains, beaches, favelas and cities.

Simkin recounts his adventures with vivid detail and honesty through the journey, whilst reflecting on his life and girl back home, affectionately called the GBH.

The story of how food reflects the culture across the continent makes this a relatable and unique story for food, culture and travel lovers alike. (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to Matt Simkin and the publisher for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. This book is available for purchase now.

I haven’t traveled much at all, and I’ve been asked to stay out of the kitchen on numerous occasions, so I came into this book a little unsure what to expect. I found it highly enjoyable. Matt Simkin decides to leave the daily grind behind him as he heads across Latin America, immersing himself in the food as well as the culture.

I liked how honest this book was. While it was overall an amazing experience for the author, he also mentioned when it was…slightly less than amazing. I laughed a little at his comments regarding a group of self-righteous, hypocritical hippies. I felt like I was traveling along, albeit from the comfort of my home.

The headers of each entry were fantastic: “Tikal- Best served with termites, and Ushuaia- Best served at the end of the world” were a couple of my favorites.  There was a sense of humor as well as a genuine appreciation for each part of his adventure that was refreshing to read.

Oh- I need to mention that Matt Simkin was trekking all over the place with a broken foot! That was impressive! All in all, I quite liked this incredibly unique and entertaining book.

Firefly Book Tag

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I thought I’d try my hand at a my own book tag, for the first time. Of course it has to be Firefly-related, to make my nerdy heart happy. So… take me out to the black, tell ’em I ain’t coming back!

Malcolm Reynolds- A Book with a Conflicted Character

“Mercy is the mark of a great man.” (stabs defeated opponent) 
“I guess I’m just a good  man” (stabs opponent again)
“Well…I’m alright.”
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The Dragonlance Chronicles by Margaret Weiss and Tracy Hickman: Tanis is a very conflicted character. He’s often at war with himself, just like Mal. He’s also in a leadership role and feels that weight immensely.

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Zoe- A Book With a Hardcore Female Character:
Mal: “Well, look at this! Appears we got here just in the nick of time. What does that make us?”
Zoe: “Big damn heroes, sir!”
Mal: “Ain’t we just.”

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Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake: Each of the three queens is strong in her own way, although at the moment Katharine (the poisoner queen) comes to mind.

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Wash- A Character or Book With a Good Sense of Humor:

“We’re all doomed! Who’s flying this thing?! Oh right, that would be me. Back to work.”

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Kill the Farm Boy by Delilah S. Dawson and Kevin Hearne

This book is so stinking funny, and its sequel is even better. I love clever humor and this book has it in spades.

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Jayne: A Violent Book or Character
“You know what the chain of command is? It’s the chain I go get and beat you with ’til ya understand who’s in ruttin’ command here.”

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Red Rising by Pierce Brown
One of the many things I love about this series is that no character is safe. The body count builds rather quickly. When revenge turns into revolution, things tend to get messy.

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Kaylee- An Optimistic Book or Character:
Mal: “I don’t think there’s a power in the ‘verse that can stop Kaylee from being cheerful. Sometimes you just wanna duct tape her mouth and dump her in the hold for a month.” 
Kaylee:  “I love my captain.”

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The Perks of Being A Wallflower by Stephen Chobsky:
Okay, hear me out on this one. This book deals with some incredibly heavy subjects. It makes me cry every time (and I reread this one a lot), but it ends on a feeling of hope. I can’t really explain it. If you read it, you’ll get what I mean.

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Inara: A Book or Character that’s mysterious:
Mal: “How’s business?”
Inara: “None of yours.”

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The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern: One of the many things I love about this book is the air of mystery and impossibility of the Cirque Des Reves, as well as the characters.

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Shepard Book- A Book or Character involving faith
“You don’t fix faith. Faith fixes you.”

Not a Fan by Kyle Idleman: I don’t read a lot of faith-based books, just my Bible. But this book really resonated with me.

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Simon Tam- A Book or Character that’s highly intelligent:
” I don’t care what you’ve done, I don’t know what you’re planning on doing, but I’m trusting you. I think you should do the same. ‘Cause I don’t see this working any other way.”
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The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford-English Dictionary by Simon Winchester

This book is fascinating, and I definitely learned some things while reading it. Who knew the dictionary had such an interesting beginning?

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River Tam: A Book or Character that’s a bit creepy:
“Also, I can kill you with my brain.”

Imaginary Friend by Stephen Chobsky:
I’m about two thirds of the way through this book, and I can honestly say it’s given me the wiggins. I am loving it so far.

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Well, that’s it for my first attempt at a book tag. If you want to try it with your choices, please be sure to tag me as the creator. I’d love to see what you come up with!

Mental Illness Awareness Week 2019: Bookish Opinions

**This post discusses mental illness and might include something upsetting. Please continue at your own discretion.**

Here’s the thing: I live with mental illness. Along with many, many others, I don’t often talk about it. Why? Stigma. It’s hard to talk about something that is often belittled or disbelieved. Over the years, I’ve gotten some seriously odd (and at times, harmful) comments regarding my bipolar. But I’ve realized something: there is absolutely no reason for me to feel ashamed or embarrassed by my mental illness. Yes, sometimes I am fighting a battle with myself. But I’m fighting, which I think I should be proud of.

Being me, I have several books that I’ve read over the years that portray mental illness in a way that helps me. Here are a few of them. And please know this: if you struggle with mental illness, you are not alone. You are not lesser than. You are not a burden. Not ever.

It’s Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini : inspired by Ned Vizinni’s own mental hospital stay. It discusses suicide, depression, and finding hope.

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“People are screwed up in this world. I’d rather be with someone screwed up and open about it than somebody perfect and ready to explode.”
Ned Vizzini, It’s Kind of a Funny Story

If You Feel Too Much: Thoughts on Things Found and Lost and Hoped For by Jamie Tworkoski : Written by the founder of To Write Love on Her Arms, these emails and poems discuss depression, drug use, faith, and accepting help.

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You are more than just your pain. You are more than wounds, more than drugs, more than death and silence.There is still some time to be surprised. There is still some time to ask for help. There is still some time to start again. There is still some time for love to find you. It’s not too late. You’re not alone. It’s okay –whatever you need and however long it takes- its okay. It’s okay. If you feel too much, there’s still a place for you here. If you feel too much, don’t go. There is still some time.”  -Jamie Tworkowski, If You Feel Too Much

An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness by Kay Redfield Jamison : Jamison’s autobiography is incredibly uplifting because, not only did I completely relate, but she is a talented mental health professor despite (because of?) her illness.

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I have seen the breadth and depth and width of my mind and heart and seen how frail they both are, and how ultimately unknowable they both are. – Kay Redfield Jamison, An Unquiet Mind

The Perks of Being a Wallflower Stephen Chobsky: This beautiful book discusses ptsd, depression, possible unspecified mood disorder, and drug use.

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So, this is my life. And I want you to know that I am both happy and sad and I’m still trying to figure out how that could be.- Stephen Chobsky, Perks of Being a Wallflower

Wishful Drinking by Carrie Fisher: talks mainly about bipolar disorder.

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“One of the things that baffles me (and there are quite a few) is how there can be so much lingering stigma with regards to mental illness, specifically bipolar disorder. In my opinion, living with manic depression takes a tremendous amount of balls. Not unlike a tour of Afghanistan (though the bombs and bullets, in this case, come from the inside). At times, being bipolar can be an all-consuming challenge, requiring a lot of stamina and even more courage, so if you’re living with this illness and functioning at all, it’s something to be proud of, not ashamed of.
They should issue medals along with the steady stream of medication.” 
― Carrie Fisher, Wishful Drinking


Are there any books that you feel portray mental illness well? What are they? I’d love to get a list going!

 

Marvel Avengers Book Tag


I have yet to see Endgame (please no spoilers!), but this tag looked like fun. I saw it over at theorangutanlibrarian’s blog. Check it out! If you know who the original credit goes to, please let me know so that I can add that to this post. Here goes:

Iron Man – a book that made you laugh out loud: I am America and So Can You by Stephen ColbertImage result for iron man  imagesImage result for i am america and so can you

It’s been a while since I’ve read it, but this book made me full-on guffaw.

Captain America- A Book that Sends a Positive Message: Wishful Drinking by Carrie Fisher

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“One of the things that baffles me (and there are quite a few) is how there can be so much lingering stigma with regards to mental illness, specifically bipolar disorder. In my opinion, living with manic depression takes a tremendous amount of balls. Not unlike a tour of Afghanistan (though the bombs and bullets, in this case, come from the inside). At times, being bipolar can be an all-consuming challenge, requiring a lot of stamina and even more courage, so if you’re living with this illness and functioning at all, it’s something to be proud of, not ashamed of. They should issue medals along with the steady stream of medication.”

Having been diagnosed with Bipolar 1 several years ago, I find this book incredibly empowering. The fact that it’s also often hilarious is an added bonus.

Thor- A Book With a Character Whose Strength You Admire: Oddmire: Changeling by William RitterImage result for thor imagesImage result for oddmire changeling images

I love the twins’ mom in this book! She charges into the Wild Wood after her sons with no thought for herself or her safety, simply because they might be in danger. She’s a hardcore mom and I love seeing that kind of bravery represented in a book. Being a parent is definitely not for the weak.

Black Widow- A Book With a Hardcore Female Protagonist: Crown of Feathers by Nicki Pau Preto

Image result for infinity war black widow imagesImage result for crown of feathersVeronyka pretty much rocks. I mean, she is willing to disguise herself to join the phoenix riders, fight while on the back of a giant bird, as well as defy her very manipulative and controlling sister (which might be the scariest of all).

Hulk- A Book that Made You Incredibly Angry: Queen of Air and Darkness by Cassandra Clare

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I went into the reasoning behind my absolute disgust with this book at length in its review (which I will link at the end of this post, if anyone is interested). Suffice it to say, it was so bad that it ruined the entire trilogy for me.

Hawkeye- An Underrated Book that You Think More People Should Pay Attention to: The Twisted Tree by Rachel Burge

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More people need to read this book. It’s a fast read, with a deliciously eerie feel to it. This is a great one to read on a stormy day.

Loki- A Book With a Twist or Surprise that Tricked You: The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton

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I’m not sure I’d believe anyone who told me that they’d called every twist in this book. It was absolutely wonderful.

Reviews I’ve done:
Oddmire: Changeling by William Ritter
Crown of Feathers by Nicki Pau Preto
Queen of Air and Darkness by Cassandra Clare
The Twisted Tree by Rachel Burge
The Seven and a Half Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton

If you decide to participate, please link back to me. I’d love to see what your answers are!

O.W.Ls Readathon 2019

I admit: like a large part of the population, I’m a Harry Potter fan. Actually, at this point, I’m afraid I’m moving toward being a Harry Potter hipster (“I liked Harry Potter before JK Rowling started in on the constant retconning”). Either way, I’m participating in the O.W.Ls readathon for the first time this year. For those who don’t know what that is, here’s a link to the official video: video.

I’m taking the O.W.Ls required to work toward a career as a librarian. Seriously, it sounds wonderful. Here are the books I’m planning on reading to fulfill each subject requirement. I’m a huge mood reader, though, so these are all subject to change:

Ancient Runes- A Retelling: Blanca and Roja by Anna-Marie Mclemore-

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The biggest lie of all is the story you think you already know.The del Cisne girls have never just been sisters; they’re also rivals, Blanca as obedient and graceful as Roja is vicious and manipulative. They know that, because of a generations-old spell, their family is bound to a bevy of swans deep in the woods. They know that, one day, the swans will pull them into a dangerous game that will leave one of them a girl, and trap the other in the body of a swan.
But when two local boys become drawn into the game, the swans’ spell intertwines with the strange and unpredictable magic lacing the woods, and all four of their fates depend on facing truths that could either save or destroy them. Blanca & Roja is the captivating story of sisters, friendship, love, hatred, and the price we pay to protect our hearts. (taken from Amazon)

I’m in the middle of reading this one right now. It seems to be a mash-up of Snow White and Rose Red and Swan Lake. Despite loving the tale of Swan Lake, I’m really not enjoying this book so far. It’s told from multiple points of view, but the chapters are so short that there’s really no time to get to know these characters and I’m struggling to connect with the story. Here’s hoping it improves.

Arithmancy- Work Written by Multiple Authors: The Big Book of Classic Fantasy edited by Ann and Jeff Vandermeer

The Big Book of Classic Fantasy ebook by

From the fairy tales we first heard as children, fantasy stories have always been with us. They illuminate the odd and the uncanny, the wondrous and the fantastic: all the things we know are lurking just out of sight–on the other side of the looking-glass, beyond the music of the impossibly haunting violin, through the dark trees of the forest. Other worlds, talking animals, fairies, goblins, demons, tricksters, and mystics: these are the elements that populate a rich literary tradition that spans the globe.
In this collection, Ann and Jeff VanderMeer explore the stories that shaped our modern idea of “fantasy.” There are the expected pillars of the genre: the Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen, Mary Shelley, Christina Rossetti, Nikolai Gogol, Franz Kafka, L. Frank Baum, Robert E. Howard, and J. R. R. Tolkien. But it’s the unexpected treasures from Asian, Eastern European, Scandinavian, and Native American traditions–including fourteen stories never before available in English–that show that the urge to imagine surreal circumstances, bizarre creatures, and strange new worlds is truly a universal phenomenon. A work composed both of careful scholarship and fantastic fun, The Big Book of Classic Fantasy is essential reading for anyone who’s never forgotten the stories that first inspired feelings of astonishment and wonder. (taken from Amazon)

I’m also currently reading this book, since I tend to read two or three books at the same time. I’m odd that way. My fantasy and fairy tale- loving self is fascinated by this book so far.

Defense Against the Dark Arts- Reducto! A book starting with “R”: The Red Scrolls of Magic by Cassandra Clare

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All Magnus Bane wanted was a vacation—a lavish trip across Europe with Alec Lightwood, the Shadowhunter who against all odds is finally his boyfriend. But as soon as the pair settles in Paris, an old friend arrives with news about a demon-worshipping cult called the Crimson Hand that is bent on causing chaos around the world. A cult that was apparently founded by Magnus himself. Years ago. As a joke.Now Magnus and Alec must race across Europe to track down the Crimson Hand and its elusive new leader before the cult can cause any more damage. As if it wasn’t bad enough that their romantic getaway has been sidetracked, demons are now dogging their every step, and it is becoming harder to tell friend from foe. As their quest for answers becomes increasingly dire, Magnus and Alec will have to trust each other more than ever—even if it means revealing the secrets they’ve both been keeping. (taken from Amazon)

The Shadowhunter books are guilty pleasures for me. I think we can all agree that the writing isn’t necessarily the most incredible ever, but the world is a lot of fun. This book releases on the ninth and I’m really hoping to be able to read it a.s.ap.

History of Magic- Published at Least Ten Years Ago: The Beat Book: Writings from the Beat Generation

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The Beat Book: Writings from the Beat Generation:  This will be a reread for me, and it won’t be the first time I’ve reread this amazing book. It’s National Poetry Month, though, so I figure that gives me the perfect excuse to dive right back into the fearless, creative writing that defined the Beat Generation.

Transfiguration: Sprayed Edges or Red Cover- Lenny’s Book of Everything by Karen Foxlee

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You can’t get much redder than this gorgeous cover. I recently posted a review on this book, which you can check out here. This book was beautiful but very, very sad.

There you have it! Are any of you participating in this year’s O.W.Ls readathon? What career have you chosen? Oh, in case you were wondering: I’m a Ravenclaw.

Daisy Jones & the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid


This book is the engrossing story of the rise- and implosion- of the seventies band Daisy Jones and the Six. It was written so skillfully that I honestly thought it was nonfiction until about two thirds of the way through. I was actually about to look up some of their songs on Youtube when I saw the blurb on the back of the book jacket and realized the band doesn’t really exist.

Told in the band members’ “own words,” it’s written completely in the form of multiple interviews. Each band member (I can’t say “character” because the book feels so much like nonfiction to me) has his or her own separate version of events, the way things would be remembered by actual band members. Each person has their own stuff going on which blends into the band drama during its rise to fame and, ultimately, its ending.

There’s sex, drugs, and rock n’ roll, of course, but it’s much more than that. It tells the story of misunderstood love, learning who you are, hitting rock bottom and where to go from there, and choices. I was enthralled by the entire book, hanging on every word. I hoped for them, got angry when they did something stupid, and was filled with pity when life dumped on them.

This is the first book I’ve read by Reid, but I’m determined to read her others. If they’re half as good as this book, I’m in for a treat. Have you read this? What are your thoughts?

I Watched it Before I Read it

Like, most readers I know, I prefer to read a book before I see a movie or TV show adaptation, but every once in a while I see the movie first. Usually, it’s because I didn’t realize that whatever I’d seen was based on a book until afterward. So, coming clean: here are a few that I did backwards:The Shining by Stephen King:Image result for the shining movieImage result for the shining bookI saw the movie long before I read the book. I love the movie: it’s good, over the top fun, and Jack Nicholson gave that role everything he had. The book is very different, and I didn’t like it, to be honest. I might have enjoyed it if I had read it before seeing the movie, but Stephen King is real hit-or-miss for me, so it might not have made a difference.The Disaster Artist:Image result for the disaster artist movieImage result for the disaster artist book
The book was on my to be read list for so long that I just kind of forgot about it. I saw the movie, starring James and Dave Franco, and was fascinated. The book is even more engrossing. The biggest difference for me is that Dave Franco portrayed his character as being a very likable, boy-next-door kind of guy. That character, Greg, comes across as a selfish freeloader in the book, which is interesting to me, since Greg helped write it. I recommend both the book and the movie. They’re both fantastic.Whip It:Image result for whip it book Image result for whip it movieThe movie is a blast to watch, full of fun, sassy women. I didn’t realize that it was based on a book until after watching it. I didn’t like the book at all. The main character, Bliss, is such a jerk! I couldn’t connect to her character at all. The movie is much better, in my opinion.Killing Eve:Image result for killing eve bookImage result for killing eveThis show is phenomenal. About a female MI5 officer who realizes the trained assassin everyone is looking for is female long before anyone else does. She enters into a game of cat and mouse with the assassin: but who’s the cat and who’s the mouse? Sandra Oh acted it brilliantly (I believe she won an award for it) and I”m dying to read the books the show is based on. I haven’t gotten to them yet, but I’m hoping to soon.Cirque Du Freak:Image result for cirque du freak movie Image result for cirque du freak  bookI have no idea what about the movie made me want to read the book. It was just sort of “meh” for me. Unfortunately, I felt the same about the book. You win some, you lose some.Catch Me if You Can:Image result for catch me if you can movie Image result for catch me if you can bookI’ve seen this movie so many times! I love how it showcases Leonardo D’Carprio’s ability to portray so many different characters so flawlessly, and Christopher Walken just flat-out rocks. The book is similar to the movie in many ways, with the notable exception of the relationship between Frank and his dad. That was very different in the movie. One thing I do wish they’d put in the movie that they didn’t is that Frank managed to teach at BYU in Utah for a while. I think that’s hilarious since I grew up in Utah. I like both the book and the movie and I suggest you check them both out.And the entire reason I got thinking about the movies I’ve seen first is…The Dirt:Image result for the dirt bookRelated imageI just saw this (sort of: I looked away from a lot of it because. It was incredibly interesting and I’m curious about the book, which I have yet to read. I’m honestly amazed that all the band members are still living, considering the things they did to themselves. Anyway, full disclosure: the movie is pretty harsh and abrasive. Fascinating, but harsh.What are some books that you’ve read after seeing their cinematic adaptations? Thoughts?