A Noble’s Path by I.L Cruz- Book Blog Tour

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Divided loyalties test Inez Garza. The infamous incident at the Academy of Natural Studies has forced her to work for the King’s Men while continuing to serve the hidden market.Supporting Birthright furthers the cause of Magical Return, but the cost may be the fall of the royal house and losing Zavier forever.And the strongest pull of all is her growing and erratic magic, which demands everything and offers only destruction in return.Inez must decide where her loyalties lie—saving Canto or saving herself. (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to Bosky Flame Press for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. This book will be available for purchase on March 25th.

I enjoyed the first book in the series, A Smuggler’s Path, and I think this book was even better. It was a natural progression from the first, and felt as if there had been no pause at all. It’s always nice for a series to feel consistent.

Inez is the main character of this book, as she was in the first. She was tenacious and did her best to overcome her fears. At times she felt very naive to me, but that was well- balanced with some of the other characters, who were a bit more wise to the ways of the world. I’m still a big fan of Rowley.

I must say, I loved that Inez had to do what was basically a fantasy book’s equivalent to community service! It was such a fun way to continue the series. I feel that this series’ strength lies in its world building.

As with the first book, I feel that this will appeal to a large age range. I know my sixth grader would love this, and I enjoyed it as well. This book is a delightful foray into the kind of fantasy I loved when I was younger. It’s a fun book, and I’m looking forward to continuing the series.

About the Author

I.L. Cruz decided to make writing her full-time career during the economic downturn in 2008. Since then she’s used her BA in International Relations to sow political intrigue in her fantasy worlds and her MA in history to strive for the perfect prologue. When she’s not engaged in this mad profession she indulges her wanderlust as often as possible, watches too much sci-fi and reads until her eyes cross. She lives in Maryland with her husband, daughter and a sun-seeking supermutt named Dipper.

Find her on Twitter @ILCruzWrites
or her blog, Fairytale Feminista at https://fairytalefeminista.wordpress.com
And her website http://www.booksbyilcruz.com

Feathertide by Beth Cartwright

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Marea was born to be different – a girl born covered in the feathers of a bird, and kept hidden in a crumbling house full of secrets. When her new tutor, the Professor, arrives with his books, maps and magical stories, he reveals a world waiting outside the window and her curiosity is woken. Caught in the desire to discover her identity and find out why she has feathers fluttering down her back like golden thistledown, she leaves everything she has ever known and goes in search of the father she has never met.

This hunt leads her to the City of Murmurs, a place of mermaids and mystery, where jars of swirling mist are carried through the streets by the broken-hearted. It is here that she learns about love, identity and how to accept being that little bit different. (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to Ebery Publishing for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. It will be available on July thirtieth.

This is a rare book. It’s the kind of quiet beautiful that reminds me why I like to read so very much. I was blown away by how a story with only a few characters could manage to feel so big. I loved every moment of it.

This book is about Marea, a girl born with feathers. She spends much of her young life watching the birds out her window and wondering if she’s more girl or more bird. As she gets older, she decides to leave the safety of her childhood and venture to the City of Murmurs, in search of her father and of answers.

One of the things I loved about this book is that, while ostensibly looking for her father, what Marea is really searching for is herself. At its core, this lovely book is about discovering who we are, embracing our uniqueness, and being courageous enough to share our differences with the world.

Marea herself was a wonderful main character. She was very unsure of herself, but also very believable. She was also extremely easy to relate to. I think all of us have our insecurities. The side characters were also fantastic: there was Sybel, who ultimately became like a mother to Marea; Leo, who offered to help Marea find her father; the Keeper of the Hours (oh my goodness, I loved that idea!); and Elver, who I refuse to spoil by saying anything about.

The City of Murmurs itself is really a character. I love books where the setting comes to life and Beth Cartwright crafted such a creative and beautiful world that I was immediately engrossed.

This is not a book with action scenes. You won’t find daring fights, or dastardly villains. What you will find, however, is an unassuming masterpiece, a book that will stay with you. I know I’ll find myself returning to the City of Murmurs again before too long.

I recommend this book very highly.

Giveaway- The Rome of Fall by Chad Alan Gibbs

The Rome of Fall by [Gibbs, Chad Alan]
              After leaving mysteriously two decades ago, financial ruin and his dying mother have brought Marcus Brinks back to his hometown of Rome, Alabama. Brinks, the former lead singer of ’90s indie-rock band Dear Brutus, takes a job teaching at his old school, where years ago, he and his friend Jackson conspired to get Deacon, the starting quarterback, and resident school jerk, kicked off the football team. Now it’s Jackson, head coach of Rome, who rules the school like Caesar, while Deacon plots his demise. This time Brinks refuses to get involved, opting instead for a quiet life with his high school crush, Becca. But will dreams of domestic bliss go up in flames when repercussions from the past meet the lying, cheating, and blackmail of the present? (taken from Amazon)

I’m so excited to announce my first giveaway on my blog: The Rome of Fall by Chad Alan Gibbs ( find my review here). As I remarked to a fellow blogger, at this point Chad Alan Gibbs could write a book about the color beige, and I’d be excited to read it. The Rome of Fall is an incredibly enjoyable nostalgia-filled book, and is easily one of the best books I’ve read in quite a while.

Chad Alan Gibbs has generously offered five physical copies as prizes! However, if you aren’t one of the lucky winners, you can pick up your own copy on March 17th.

So, now to the rules:
1. U.S. residents only for this particular giveaway
2. Comment below so I can add you to the drawing. Something as simple as “Yo” or “Wazzup!”  works great, but I’d love to hear a memory/song/etc that makes you nostalgic for the 90’s.
3. The contest ends Friday, March 20th. I’ll list winners here, as well as on a separate post, so keep your eyes out.

That’s it. You’re in. While I’ve got you here, I also highly recommend Chad Alan Gibbs’ debut novel, Two Like Me and You.

A Smuggler’s Path by I.L Cruz

Image result for a smuggler's pathIn Canto, magic is a commodity, outlawed by the elites after losing a devastating war and brokered by smugglers on the hidden market. But some know it’s more–a weapon for change.

Inez Garza moves through two worlds. She’s a member of the noble class who works as a magical arms dealer–a fact either group would gladly use against her. Neither know her true purpose–funding Birthright, an underground group determined to return magic to all at any cost.
But the discovery of a powerful relic from before the Rending threatens her delicate balance.
Inez’s inherent magic, which lies dormant in all the Canti, has been awakened. Now the Duchess’s daughter, radical and smuggler must assume another forbidden title–mage, a capital crime. This will bring her to the attention of factions at home–fanatical rebels bent on revolution, a royal family determined to avoid another magical war, her mercenary colleagues at the hidden market willing to sell her abilities to the highest bidder–and in Mythos, victors of the war and architects of the Rending.
Evasion has become Inez’s specialty, but even she isn’t skilled enough to hide from everyone–and deny the powers drawing her down a new path. (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to Rachel Poli at Bosky Flame Press for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. This book is available for purchase now.

This is the sort of fantasy that is a joy to read. It’s fun, fast-paced, and full of unique characters and a great history. I loved the way the author gave a bunch of history in the prologue, and managed to tell it simply and in a way that made the story seem even more intriguing.

Inez was an enjoyable main character. Her need to survive was often at odds with who she was, and I loved watching her character grow and evolve. While she was a strong character, she was strong in an atypical way. She’s not unfeeling, she doesn’t think she’s an island, and she doesn’t have a “chosen one” complex. It was refreshing.

The other characters in this book were equally enjoyable. I loved that Rowley is a talking dog. That just tickled me. I also liked the little nods I saw throughout the book: seeing “Jabberwocky” written is always fun.

It does take a bit of time to get going, but that setup is far from boring. The slower build-up gave me a chance to really get acquainted with I.L. Cruz’s world and showcased her excellent writing abilities. If my interest is kept during a slower beginning, I know the writer is talented.

This is the sort of fantasy that works well for pretty much any age group. It’s creative and fun. I recommend giving it a read!

Chain of Gold by Cassandra Clare

Image result for chain of goldCordelia Carstairs is a Shadowhunter, a warrior trained since childhood to battle demons. When her father is accused of a terrible crime, she and her brother travel to London in hopes of preventing the family’s ruin. Cordelia’s mother wants to marry her off, but Cordelia is determined to be a hero rather than a bride. Soon Cordelia encounters childhood friends James and Lucie Herondale and is drawn into their world of glittering ballrooms, secret assignations, and supernatural salons, where vampires and warlocks mingle with mermaids and magicians. All the while, she must hide her secret love for James, who is sworn to marry someone else.

But Cordelia’s new life is blown apart when a shocking series of demon attacks devastate London. These monsters are nothing like those Shadowhunters have fought before—these demons walk in daylight, strike down the unwary with incurable poison, and seem impossible to kill. London is immediately quarantined. Trapped in the city, Cordelia and her friends discover that their own connection to a dark legacy has gifted them with incredible powers—and forced a brutal choice that will reveal the true cruel price of being a hero. (taken from Amazon)

Here’s the weird thing: the Shadowhunter books have everything I hate in a book. Annoying love triangles (or octagons)? Check. Constant clothing descriptions? Check. Angst coming out of the wazoo? Double check. So, why on earth are these books my guilty pleasure (except for Queen of Air and Darkness. That was an unmitigated disaster)? Two reasons: the universe Cassandra Clare has created, and Magnus Bane. Now that we’ve gotten that figured out, let’s move on to my actual review, shall we?

I was incredibly nervous about this book after reading Queen of Air and Darkness. Thankfully, I was able to breathe a sigh of relief. Cassandra was back in form for this book, and it worked very very well. There wasn’t anything earth shattering in terms of plot: there’s still angst, misunderstood and unrequited love, and brooding galore, but the sense of fun in previous books was back. There were many more fight scenes, which I loved. I enjoyed seeing the creativity used to describe some of the demons, and the seraph blades were in use again, which was something I’d been missing lately.

The characters were all a blast, although two stood out to me: Lucie, a spunky Shadowhunter who writes truly terrible fiction in her spare time; and Matthew, a ne’er do well with a sardonic sense of humor and hidden depth. The book centers around Cordelia, who has traveled from Idris with her mom and brother, in an attempt to ingratiate herself into London Society, the end goal being to help her dad who has been accused of a grievous crime. Of course, all chaos breaks loose, and the next thing you know, demons are running amok. There’s also a mysterious illness that is striking down Shadowhunters.

Cordelia, Lucie, and Matthew are joined by their friends, jokingly known as the Merry Thieves, as they try to do what the Clave can’t: save their friends. The storyline was a lot of fun because there was a bit of a mystery thrown in. I also enjoyed the Merry Thieves and their camaraderie. It felt very genuine. The James-Cordelia- Grace love triangle annoyed me, as love triangles always do. It wasn’t as bad as it’s been in the last few books, however; there was more to the book than just angst, which was fabulous.

Magnus made a short appearance, which I loved. The book is fast-paced, and once again the world itself is a load of fun. For those of you who haven’t read any of Cassandra Clare’s books, think Buffy with tattoos, and you’re close. I always enjoy seeing the vampires, fae, warlocks, Silent Brothers, and more that show up.

There were some things that I didn’t love, aside from the angst I’ve already talked about. Anna, for example. I wanted to love her, but the author had her constantly winking. It was weird. In every single one of her scenes, she “dropped a wink.” I ended up imagining a constant eye twitch. It made what could have been an awesome character fall a little flat.

I also didn’t love Tatiana, mainly because I wanted a more three dimensional character than what was written. There’s still time for development for her, though, so we’ll see.

All in all, I found Chain of Gold to be a blast to read. I’m looking forward to Cassandra Clare’s next book, something I wasn’t sure would happen again. Yay!

Venators: Magic Unleashed by Devri Walls- Write Reads Blog Tour

The dark unknown beckons.
Rune Jenkins has a long-standing infatuation with anything from the supernatural world, and she’s trying to hide it. If she doesn’t, she angers her reckless twin brother Ryker, and starts feeling like her own sanity is slipping. But the closer she gets to Grey Malteer – an old friend who waves his fascination with fantasy like a flag – the harder it becomes to stifle her own interest. The supernatural suddenly invades their reality when other-worldly creatures come hunting for the three college students. With help from a mysterious savior Rune and Grey escape, but must follow Ryker’s abductors into an alternate dimension, Eon, and discover their true identities. They are Venators, descendants of genetically enhanced protectors and sentries between Eon and Earth. In this world of fae, vampires, werewolves, and wizards, power is abundant and always in flux. Ryker is missing, and Rune and Grey are being set up as pawns in a very dangerous game. The three must find their way through and out of Eon, before it consumes them. (taken from Amazon)

I must say, I was so jazzed to be a part of this book blog tour. I’d heard some great buzz about this book, and was eager to jump in. Venators: Magic Unleashed is a fast-paced book full of action and excitement.

This book follows Grey and Rune, two college students who learn they are in fact venators, enhanced humans with the power to fight all manner of unpleasant creatures- you know, the sort that aren’t supposed to exist. Except they do, which Rune discovers as both she and Grey find themselves in an alternate dimension. They need to somehow rescue Rune’s abducted brother (who, by the way, is a major jerk) and get back to their own world.

One of the interesting things about this book is the sheer variety of fantastical creatures included. There are the more common vampires and werewolves. Then, you get elves, fae, succubi, incubi, wizards, goblins and more. Verida, the sassiest vampire I’ve read in quite a while, was my favorite character. She added spunk and a sense of adventure.

I didn’t really connect all that much with Grey or Rune. Although, there were some things set up that I think will come into play quite well in book two, making them grow and develop into very complex characters.

The book jumps pretty much right into action, with development along the way, as opposed to the dreaded info dump. The action is scattered liberally throughout the story, upping the ante and adding to the excitement.

This was a highly entertaining read. I’m curious to see what happens in book two. Pick this book up and tell me what you think!

Queens of Fennbirn by Kendare Blake

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Together in print for the first time in this paperback bind-up, the dazzling prequels to the Three Dark Crowns series are finally available for fans to have and to (literally) hold. Uncover the sisters’ origins, dive deep into the catastrophic reign of the Oracle Queen, and reveal layers of Fennbirn’s past, hidden until now.

The Young Queens

Get a glimpse of triplet queens Mirabella, Arsinoe, and Katharine during a short period of time when they protected and loved one another. From birth until their claiming ceremonies, this is the story of the three sisters’ lives…before they were at stake.

The Oracle Queen

Everyone knows the legend of Elsabet, the Oracle Queen. The one who went mad. The one who orchestrated a senseless, horrific slaying of three entire houses. But what really happened? Discover the true story behind the queen who could foresee the future…just not her own downfall. (taken from Amazon)

I love Kendare Blake’s writing. The darker tones present throughout her Three Dark Crowns series adds a glorious sense of the gothic. This book of two novellas was no different.

Both of these stories take place in Fennbirn, the world of the Three Dark Crowns. I would suggest reading at least the first few books in the actual series before picking these novellas up, because you’ll get spoilers otherwise. There are also things in this book that won’t make as much sense if you haven’t already read the others.

In The Young Queens, we get a bigger view of the queens’ lives before they were pitted against each other and the events of the Three Dark Crowns series unfolded. While I can see why this novella is so well-liked, I honestly didn’t feel that it added anything to the original story. In fact (and this is a weird opinion), I preferred getting only glimpses of the queens’ time together prior to their fight for the crown. This book was sweet in many ways, but it just didn’t do it for me. From a technical standpoint, the writing was as strong as ever, but this novella just felt…unnecessary.

The Oracle Queen, though! Holy Hannah, that packed a punch! Kendare Blake’s ability to keep me on the edge of my seat is once again made apparent. The story of the last oracle queen is full of intrigue, betrayal, and more than a bit of violence. I loved every moment of it. Kendare Blake has never shied away from being mean to her characters, a trait that makes her books unpredictable and compelling. I suggest picking up this book of novellas for this story alone.

This was a good book, even though I didn’t love The Young Queens, and it’s definitely worth adding to your shelf.

The ABC’s of Fantasy: Favorites by Letter

I love fantasy books. There’s something amazing about diving into a new world of someone else’s creation. I also suffer from a sleep disorder. Last night, while trying desperately to fall asleep, I started thinking of excellent fantasy authors in alphabetical order. I didn’t fall asleep, but I came up with a great list. These are some-but not all- of the fantasy authors I suggest reading.

A- The Book of Three by LLoyd Alexander: In a very small nutshell, this book follows Taran, the assistant pig-keeper as he finds himself the unlikely hero in a battle of good vs. evil. There is something wonderful and endearing about this book for younger readers

B- Magic Kingdom for Sale/Sold by Terry Brooks. Terry Brooks is the author of the Shanara series, which is much more well-known. This book, about Ben who buys a magic kingdom (yep!) only to land himself with more of a fixer-upper than he expected, is a blast to read. Anything by Terry Brooks is well worth picking up.

C- The Black Company series by Glen Cook. This is dark fantasy at its finest. I love the militaristic feel of these books, which is about a unit of mercenary soldiers. It’s not for the squeamish, but it’s incredibly well-written.

D- Wicked Saints by Emily A. Duncan. Gothic, atmospheric, and unlike anything I’ve read before, this book took me by surprise. There’s a lot of focus on belief and how it defines you as a person, which I loved.

E- Kings of the Wyld by Nicholas Eames. I first discovered this author in 2019, when I raced through this fantastic book. It’s about a group of has-been mercenaries who come out of retirement for one last adventure. It’s an adventure of epic proportions and I loved every moment of it.

F- Black Sun Rising by C.S. Friedman. Imagine a world where your nightmares are brought to life. Then add some fascinating characters (my favorite is the dark adept Tarrant: there’s nothing nice or tame about him), and a quest that tests loyalties, bringing everything the characters believe into question, and you’ve got a fantastic book.

G- Legend by David Gemmell. I wouldn’t suggest reading all of Gemmell’s books in a row, since they can become sort of repetitive after a while, but sometimes a good book about one person against the world is in order. This is one of the best in that vein.

H- For a Muse of Fire by Heidi Heilig. I’m kind of in love with this series. Why? Because the main character has bipolar disorder. Bipolar in fantasy??? Wow! I loved seeing such a misunderstood mental illness represented. Doubly so because, while it isn’t the crux of the story, it is part of it.

I- The Shadow of What Was Lost by James Islington is fabulous. He’s such a confident writer, and I was immediately sucked into his world. This follows a small group of characters, my favorite being Caeden. I loved how complex Caeden was.

J- The Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan is classic high fantasy. It follows a group of characters as they find themselves in a struggle much bigger than they could have imagined. If you haven’t read this (admittedly long) series, now’s the perfect time to start: there’s a show coming out based on the series.

K- Windward by S. Kaeth. I recently finished this book and I quite enjoyed it. It has dragons! Lots and lots of them. They were represented in one of the most unique ways I’ve seen in fantasy.

L- The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S Lewis. I’d be remiss if I didn’t include this famous author on my list. I loved this book as a kid. I reread it not too long ago and decided that I like the recent movie better (gasp!), but it’s still an enjoyable book.

M- Dragonflight by Anne McCaffrey. This is one of the first fantasy books that I read when I started diving into the world of adult fantasy. Or does this fall into the YA category? Either way, the idea of a bond between a human and a dragon is one that really appealed to me.

N-Douglas Niles. I enjoy pretty much any book he’s written. I wouldn’t group him with, say, Tolkien, but his books are just fun. Sometimes, a bit of fun is all that I need in a book. Look for his name among series such as Dragonlance and Forgotten Realms.

O- Hmmm…why can’t I think of any ‘O’ authors? What do you have for ‘o’?

P- Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. Okay, I’m totally cheating and just being silly. Terry Pratchett has written a ton of fantastic books all on his own, but- darn it!- this is my list and I’m putting whatever I like on it. So, there.

Q- I’ve got nothing.

R- The Swans’ War trilogy by Sean Russell. This series has stuck with me through the years. It has a slower build-up, but the character development keeps it from getting boring. The mythology of this world is unparalleled and things ramp up into a stunning ending. I highly recommend this.

S- The Crystal Cave by Mary Stewart. I’m a sucker for Aruthurian books, especially those about Merlin. The Crystal Cave is fabulous. I’ve read it twice and loved it both times.

T- I love The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien! I’m not a huge fan of Tolkien’s other books (do I have to relinquish my fantasy-lover membership card now?), but The Hobbit is probably the most cozy fantasy I’ve read. I know that sounds weird, considering all that occurs in that book, but it makes me feel like I’m reading a hug.

U- I drew a blank on this letter.

V- The Withered King by Ricardo Victoria was a rip-roaring fantasy unlike any other. I especially liked the theme of redemption that was present in this book.

W- Anything by Margaret Weiss is good, but I’ll chuck in Soulforge, since I’m constantly going on about the Dragonlance Chronicles. Which are great, by the way. You should also make sure to read them. See what I did there? I’m pretty sneaky.

X- Nothing doing.

Y- Jane Yolen is the author of the Young Merlin trilogy, another one that I read at a younger age. It’s been quite a while since I’ve read anything other than her “How Does a Dinosaur” books (I have a toddler), but she’s one of those names that’s immediately recognizable in fantasy.

Z- Um…drat.

Well, I’ve got recommendations for most of the letters. What say you? What authors would you stick in each letter? Let me know!

Needful Things by Stephen King

Witty and Sarcastic Bookclub

Image result for needful things

I’ve read a few Stephen King books in the past, but not too many. To be honest, my opinions on the books I had previously read ranged from indifference to dislike, so I was a bit uncertain on how I’d feel about this one. I decided to read Needful Things because I loved the show “Castle Rock”, which is loosely based on Stephen Kings’ works.

Needful Things takes place in Castle Rock, Maine, which is the setting for several of King’s stories. It’s a sleepy little town. At least, it would be if it hadn’t been the site of some seriously bizarre violent happenings over the years. Leland Gaunt, a charming man, comes to town and opens a store called “Needful Things”. It seems to be a curio shop, or an odd antique store. People from the town start coming in and, luckily for them, find the thing they most…

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Cover Reveal- Prophecy: Eve of Darkness by D. Ellis Overttun




There’s something very exciting happening this March. What is it, you ask ?(Well, maybe you’re asking ‘What’s for dinner’, but I can’t hear you, so I’m making assumptions). I’ll tell you: the third installment of the Tera Nova series is releasing! Mark your calendars for March 16th. In the meantime, I get to show you the amazing cover. Here ’tis:



20191212 Prophecy Cover (300 x 480 72 DPI) (2)

That’s epic! Book one and two are already out, and I recommend you give them a read. They’re fantastic! (You can find my review of book 1, titled Universe Awakening (Redux Edition) here). 



Auberon and Natasha, now two of the most wanted criminals on Arkos, have fled to the Westside. They have taken temporary refuge in Edenoud with Dion, son of Heron, as they contemplate their future. However, a dream has prompted them to return to the Eastside to warn First Minister Odessa. What could be so disturbing that would cause them to jeopardize their own safety? Will the First Minister listen or sound the alarm?
The investigation of the incident that took place in the Chamber of Prayers is reaching its conclusion. Tendai Theodor has a sense the report will cast blame on him. Can the power of his office protect him? To balance the forces he feels are aligned against him, he journeys to the underearth to seek out an ancient and, some say, mythical enemy, the Nephilim. Are they real or just the stuff of legend?
Meanwhile, First Minister Odessa has not lost sight of the inexorable destruction of the universe. While she has continued to support efforts to locate a new home, she has genetically engineered a new servile class and a method to seed them on a planet in advance of the Celesti arrival. But where is this place? The answer lies in a curious conversation that Director Jo’el has with a surrogate for his longmissing brother, Davin. It leads to a series of star maps recorded hundreds of thousands of years ago on clay tablets.
The Celesti face another problem. They are dying. However, something is happening to Auberon and Natasha that holds promise for the continuation of their species. If it is successful, can it be replicated, or is it an isolated incident?
Prophecy: Eve of Darkness weaves a compelling tale that is a blend of human nature, science, theology and philosophy. It spans the vastness of space from one universe to another and the underground world of Arkos to a distant planet called “Terra Nova”. It holds up a mirror to the human soul, but it will require thought and contemplation to decipher what lies below the surface.