BBNYA Blog Tour: The Lore of Prometheus by Graham Austin-King

I received this book to read and review as part of the BBNYA 2020 competition and/or the BBNYA tours organised by the @The_WriteReads tours team. All opinions are my own.

BBNYA (or Book Bloggers Novel of the Year Award) is a yearly competition where book bloggers from all over the world read and score books written by indie authors. I was fortunate to be able to take part as a judge. It was a ton of fun and I was introduced to some fantastic books.

If you are an author and wish to learn more about the 2021 BBNYA competition, you can visit the official website (https://www.bbnya.com/) or our Twitter account, @BBNYA_Official. If you would like to sign-up and enter your book, you can find the BBNYA 2021 AUTHOR SIGN UP FORM HERE. Please make sure to carefully read our terms and conditions before entering. 

If you are a book blogger or reviewer, you can apply to be part of BBNYA 2021 by filling out this form (also remember to read the terms and conditions before signing up)! 


BBNYA is brought to you in association with the Folio Society (featuring gorgeous, drool-worthy books) and the book blogger support group TheWriteReads.

Congratulations to The Lore of Prometheus for its win as the 2020 Book Blogger Novel of the Year!

So, what is The Lore of Prometheus about?

John Carver has three rules: Don’t drink in the daytime, don’t gamble when the luck has gone, and don’t talk to the dead people who come to visit.

It has been almost five years since the incident in Kabul. Since the magic stirred within him and the stories began. Fleeing the army, running from the whispers, the guilt, and the fear he was losing his mind, Carver fell into addiction, dragging himself through life one day at a time.

Desperation has pulled him back to Afghanistan, back to the heat, the dust, and the truth he worked so hard to avoid. But there are others, obsessed with power and forbidden magics, who will stop at nothing to learn the truth of his gifts. Abducted and chained, Carver must break more than his own rules if he is to harness this power and survive. (Amazon blurb)

About the author:

Graham Austin-King was born in the south of England and weaned on broken swords and half-forgotten spells.

A shortage of these forced him to consume fantasy novels at an ever-increasing rate, turning to computers and tabletop gaming between meals.

He experimented with writing at the beginning of an education that meandered through journalism, international relations, and law. To this day he is committed to never allowing those first efforts to reach public eyes.

After spending a decade in Canada learning what ‘cold’ really means, and being horrified by poutine, he settled once again in the UK with a seemingly endless horde of children.

To date he is the author of five novels, drawing on a foundation of literary influences ranging from David Eddings to Clive Barker.

Kids on the March: 15 Stories of Speaking Out, Protesting, and Fighting for Justice by Michael G. Long- Book Tour

From the March on Washington to March for Our Lives to Black Lives Matter, the powerful stories of kid-led protest in America. 
  
Kids have always been activists. They have even launched movements. Long before they could vote, kids have spoken up, walked out, gone on strike, and marched for racial justice, climate protection, gun control, world peace, and more.  
 
Kids on the March tells the stories of these protests, from the March of the Mill Children, who walked out of factories in 1903 for a shorter work week, to 1951’s Strike for a Better School, which helped build the case for Brown v. Board of Education, to the twenty-first century’s most iconic movements, including March for Our Lives, the Climate Strike, and the recent Black Lives Matter protests reshaping our nation. 
  
Powerfully told and inspiring, Kids on the March shows how standing up, speaking out, and marching for what you believe in can advance the causes of justice, and that no one is too small or too young to make a difference. (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to  Algonquin Young Readers for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Kids on the March will be available on March 23rd.

Kids on the March touched me, educated me, inspired me, and left me in awe of what children have done, and continue to do, when confronted with injustice. While adults sometimes waffle- or even turn a blind eye- children stand up for change.

“When democracy was threatened, kids were there. When people on the margins needed a voice of protest, kids were there. In some cases, kids were there, marching and chanting, long before adults even thought about protesting.”– Michael G. Long

This isn’t your average history book. Aside from the fact that it focuses entirely on children’s activism throughout history, it educates in a way that is accessible for older children without speaking down to them. While there is no glorification in the sometimes ugly response to demands for change, it is also not left out. There is no pretending that opposition doesn’t exist. At the same time, the focus is on the kids’ activism.

I loved the timeline that is provided at the beginning of the book. As a homeschool teacher, this will be extremely handy. For me personally, it helped highlight how active children have been, and for how long. Kids on the March starts in 1903 and goes all the way up to 2020! That is a long history of children standing up and moving the world. It was truly astonishing to see.

There were several marches/protests that I knew nothing about. Whether that is an oversight throughout school history classes, or me just not paying enough attention growing up, it was surprising to see. There were a few early protests over issues that were eerily similar to things happening now.

At the end, there are “tips for marching”, which is exactly what it sounds like. Children can shake the world and affect change by standing up and speaking out. In many ways, children have been examples to adults. They have been examples of bravery, compassion, and action.

Kids on the March made me cry on more than one occasion. It provided me with teachable moments for my child, and moved me. I cannot recommend this book enough.

“Let us pray with our legs. Let us march in unison to the rhythm of justice, because I say enough is enough.”

-Demetri Hoth, senior at Majory Stoneman Douglas High School (2018)

Where to find the book:

Amazon
Barnes & Noble


BBNYA Book Blog Tour: The Gilded King by Josie Jaffrey

In the last city on Earth,
death is just a step into the trees.

In the Blue, the world’s last city, all is not well.
 
Julia is stuck within its walls. She serves the nobility from a distance until she meets Lucas, a boy who believes in fairytales that Julia’s world can’t accommodate. The Blue is her prison, not her castle, and she’d escape into the trees if she didn’t know that contamination and death awaited humanity outside.

But not everyone in the Blue is human, and not everyone can be contained.

Beyond the city’s boundaries, in the wild forests of the Red, Cameron has precious little humanity left to lose. As he searches for a lost queen, he finds an enemy rising that he thought long dead. An enemy that the humans have forgotten how to fight.

One way or another, the walls of the Blue are going to come down. The only question is what side you’ll be on when they do.(taken from Amazon)

I received The Gilded King to read and review as part of the BBNYA 2020 competition organized by @The_WriteReads. As always, all opinions are my own and honest.

BBNYA is a yearly competition where book bloggers from all over the world read and score books written by indie authors.

If you are an indie author and wish to learn more about the 2021 BBNYA competition, you can visit the official website (bbnya.com) or our Twitter account, @BBNYA_Official, to learn more. If you would like to sign up to enter your book, you can find the BBNYA 2021 Author Sign Up Form here. Please be sure to read the terms and conditions before entering.

BBNYA is brought to you in association with the Folio Society (with the most gorgeous book editions that I’ve had the pleasure to drool over) and The Write Reads.

The Gilded King by Josie Jaffrey did extremely well in BBNYA 2020, and I can see why! Vampires in a post-apocalyptic setting with zombies added in for spice? Definitely new and original.

The Gilded King is told from multiple points of view. Julia happens to be my favorite character. She’s clever, resilient, and doesn’t just accept the status quo. I also thought the way the characters’ relationships grew and developed was interesting.

The vampires were different than many I’ve read. I’m a bit on the fence about them, but I can’t deny the author’s creativity.

The Gilded King would be perfect for fans of Sarah J. Maas, and readers who like a bit of romance along with their fantasy.

About the author:
Josie is the author of nine self-published novels plus short stories. She is currently working on a range of fantasy and historical fiction projects (both adult and YA), for which she is seeking representation. Ultimately, she hopes to be a hybrid author, both traditionally- and self-published.

After finishing her degree in Literae Humaniores (Classics) at the University of Oxford, Josie wasn’t sure what to do with her life.

She slogged through a brief stint working for an investment bank in London during the 2008 credit crunch, then converted to law and qualified as a solicitor specialising in intellectual property. She worked at a law firm for five years before moving to a UK-based international publisher in 2016. Whilst she loved law, in the end she didn’t love it quite as much as writing, which she now does almost full time.

Josie lives in Oxford with her husband and two cats (Sparky and Gussie), who graciously permit human cohabitation in return for regular feeding and cuddles. The resulting cat fluff makes it difficult for Josie to wear black, which is largely why she gave up being a goth. Although the cats are definitely worth it, she still misses her old wardrobe.

Find Josie here:
Josie Jaffrey | Author

The End of Dreams (The Gifted and the Cursed book #3) by Marcus Lee- Storytellers on Tour

As Daleth the Witch-King and his horde ready themselves for the final battle, a small alliance prepares for a desperate last stand.
However, the alliance is weak and fractured, led by a king interested only in retaining his wealth and a lord commander consumed by his thirst for revenge. With a seemingly unbeatable army before them, invisible foes amongst them, and broken hearts between them, the alliance appears destined to fall.
Yet in these dark times, her light almost extinguished, a peasant huntress is soon to be queen. But if she can find what was lost, she might prove to be more powerful than two kings combined.
This war will bring about the end of dreams, but for whom, the gods have yet to decide.

Thank you to Storytellers on Tour for giving me the opportunity to read and review The End of Dreams. This book is available now. Not only that, the first book, Kings and Daemons, is currently free on Amazon Kindle (starting March third and ending on the seventh).

I am excited to be finishing what has been an awesome series. I’m also a little sad because, well, it’s ending. The Gifted and the Cursed series has been excellent from the start. And let me say, it ends brilliantly.

The End of Dreams starts pretty much right where Tristan’s Folly ended, and the reader is dropped smack into the middle of it. Our main players have been scattered to the wind, which can be a risky move, but worked perfectly here. It allowed the plot to grow and encompass everyone in ways that were both unexpected and fascinating. It also created a balance between physical battles and those of the mind.

One of the (many) things that I have appreciated about this series has been its tone. It is grim and dark, but this has always been offset by a layer of hope. This continued in The End of Dreams. Despite the challenges the characters faced, some which felt pretty insurmountable, they keep on going. That being said, the effects that things have had on the characters is made evident, with each of them handling it differently. Some of them found strength they didn’t know they had. Some found ways to cope that weren’t necessarily very smart. Each choice was fascinating and made perfect sense to the character’s personality. And that’s the thing. These characters were worth hoping for and being invested in. They were three-dimensional and unique.

Sometimes the final book in a series can seem small because everything is shrinking to a final confrontation. Not so with The End of Dreams. The world continued to grow and develop, as new characters and cultures were introduced. It made the stakes seem even more important. The book continued to highlight how things would effect everyone, not just the main characters.

The pacing was fantastic, with moments of character interactions liberally interspersed with fight scenes. And the fight scenes! They were raw and gritty, exactly what I love to see in a fantasy book. The tension built up to a crescendo, exploding at exactly the right moment. The ending came rushing up and I was left astounded and incredibly impressed. It finished perfectly. I am left feeling a little sad that it has ended, but that’s the mark of a great book: that it can leave a reader a little bereft when the adventure ends. I hope to see much more from author Marcus Lee in the future.

In the meantime, I highly suggest picking this series up. Be sure to click on Storytellers on Tour to read other reviews for The End of Dreams.

About the author:

Writing hasn’t always been a serious hobby for me … but it has always been there, lurking in the shadows, serving me well when called upon.

As I look back over the years, I realise I was guilty of writing many short stories, as well as poetry, and I’d like to think, that even if they were never intended to be published, they were nonetheless warmly received by the intended recipients.

Then in 2019, I was inspired to write not just a short story, or poetry, but a book. Then, suddenly, one book turned into a trilogy and a labour of love, and it was a love I wanted to share with the world.

So, here we are. The pandemic that put my career in sport on hold also gave me the opportunity to lavish time on my alternative hobby, or if demand dictates my new career.

However, only you, the reader, will decide whether this trilogy, which is still a work in progress, will be the first of many. I genuinely hope so.

Who knows, now these creatives juices are flowing, I might just keep on writing anyway.

—–

Epic fantasy has been my favourite genre since I first read The Odyssey and The Illiad as a seven-year-old. Now it’s my turn to see if I can bring another world to life in the imagination of others.

Website: https://www.marcusleebooks.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarcusLeebooks

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Marcusleebooks

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/1361488.Marcus_Lee

Newsletter: https://www.marcusleebooks.com/contact

The Ventifact Colossus by Dorian Hart- Storytellers on Tour

Book Blurb:
Banished to an otherworldly prison for centuries, the monstrous Emperor Naradawk is about to break free and wreak havoc upon the world of Spira. The archmage Abernathy can no longer keep the monster at bay, and has summoned a collection of would-be heroes to help set things right.

Surely he made a mistake. These *can’t* be the right people.

Dranko is priest-turned-pickpocket, expelled from his church for his antics. Kibilhathur is a painfully shy craftsman who speaks to stones. Aravia is a wizard’s apprentice whose intellect is eclipsed only by her arrogance. Ernest is a terrified baker’s son. Morningstar is a priestess forbidden from daylight. Tor is a young nobleman with attention issues. Ysabel is an elderly farm woman. Grey Wolf is a hard-bitten mercenary.

None of them are qualified to save the world, but they’ll have to do. Even Abernathy himself seems uncertain as to why he chose them.

What starts with a simple scouting mission soon spirals into something more far-reaching and sinister. The heroes will contest with dream warriors, evil cultists, sentient gemstones, and a devious yet infuriatingly polite gentleman with a perfect mustache, on their way to a desperate encounter with the unstoppable: The Ventifact Colossus.

The Ventifact Colossus is Book One of the Heroes of Spira.

My Review:

Thank you to the author for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Also, thank you to Storytellers on Tour for allowing me to join this tour. Books one through three of the Heroes of Spira series are available now, with book four, The Infinite Tower, coming out on April 30th.

One of the things I love about fantasy is that you can take a commonality – like a group of unlikely heroes – and make it something new and different. In The Ventifact Colossus, author Dorian Hart created a world that is full of adventure and heart. Brace yourselves, folks: this is going to be a rave.

Where should I start? First of all, the characters were fabulous. The book opens with Dranko, a priest-turned-thief who just happens to also be part human, part goblin. He’s bristly, but a good guy underneath a tough exterior. You can tell he’s been kicked around by life a bit. He finds himself with an unexpected new employer: a wizard who has gathered a ragtag group of possible-heroes. Dranko ends up traveling with several others, each with their own personality and struggles, in an attempt to prevent a very bad thing (no spoilers from me). However, as much as I loved the storyline, it was the well-written characters that won me over.

There is a three-way tie for my favorite characters. Yes, I know that’s a bit ridiculous, but I can’t narrow it down more than that. I thought Dranko was fascinating and had hidden depth. Every time I thought I figured him out, a new facet of his personality would be revealed. I also loved the kindly older woman, Mrs. Horn. She was so sweet, but had a steel backbone. She wasn’t a fighter, like some of the others, nor was she a healer, but her role was vital to the group nonetheless. And Ernie! Oh, how I loved that character! He was a jumble of low self-esteem and a huge heart. Watching his character grow and evolve was so much fun!

I love how interconnected everything was. One thing would have ramifications for others that I never saw coming. It was never done just for convenience though, and the world never felt small. On the contrary, the world was vast and felt Tolkien-esqe (ish?) in that I knew there were things left undiscovered and yet to be experienced. I’ve continued on in the series, and let me just say: the world continues to be large and intriguing.

Perhaps my favorite thing about The Ventifact Colossus is its underlying theme of hope and the goodness of people. Don’t get me wrong: the stakes are high, and the author definitely loves making the reader emotional (I’m still salty about a particular scene), but the pages didn’t scream, “Doooommmm!” at me every time I opened the book.

This is the sort of book that reminds me why fantasy is my favorite genre. Come for the adventure, stay for the amazing characters. I highly recommend this book, and the series continues to be fantastic.

Find more great reviews for The Ventifact Colossus on Storytellers on Tour!

About the author:

Dorian Hart is the author of the Heroes of Spira epic fantasy series, which currently includes The Ventifact Colossus, The Crosser’s Maze, and The Greatwood Portal. The fourth book, The Infinite Tower, should be out in February or March of 2021.

In a bygone century, Dorian graduated from Wesleyan University with a degree in creative writing. This led circuitously to a 20-year career as a video game designer, where he contributed to many award-winning titles including Thief, System Shock, System Shock 2, and BioShock.

Now he writes books in his Boston-area study, serves as the stay-at-home dad for his two teenage daughters, and happily allows his wife to drag him off on various wilderness adventures. He also spends time torturing his piano, playing the sport of pickleball, losing at board games, making terrible dad jokes, and trembling beneath the shadow of his towering TBR.

Website: https://dorianhart.com/the-heroes-of-spira/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DorianHart

Bad Habits by Flynn Meaney- The Write Reads Ultimate Blog Tour

Hilarious, bold, sparky and surprising, this is the funniest feminist book you’ll read all year.

Alex is a rebel from the tip of her purple fauxhawk to the toes of her biker boots. She’s tried everything she can think of to get expelled from her strict Catholic boarding school. Nothing has worked so far – but now, Alex has a new plan.

Tired of the sexism she sees in every corner of St Mary’s, Alex decides to stage the school’s first ever production of The Vagina Monologues. Which is going to be a challenge, as no one else at St Mary’s can even bear to say the word ‘vagina’ out loud . . . (taken from Goodreads)

Thank you to The Write Reads for allowing me to join the book tour for Bad Habits! This book is available now.

Full of wit and snark, this is a fun one for readers who like a little sass with a hint of rebellion. I do feel that it would be more appreciated by teenagers, who might be better able to…not relate, per say, but commiserate.

Bad Habits follows Alex, a rebellious teen in a far-from-envelope-pushing Catholic boarding school. In this rigid and conservative setting, Alex sticks out like a sore thumb. I felt sorry about her situation: it’s hard to feel like a square peg in a round hole, so to speak. I felt for her, but I truly did not like her. I felt that she was pretty darn judgmental and really kind of condescending toward the other girls. I think part of the reason she had such a prickly demeanor had to do with feeling let down by her parents. She made for an interesting protagonist, though.

This book is billed as being feminist but I personally saw it more as a coming-of-age tale. I liked Alex’s interaction with her friend Mary Kate, which highlighted that a bit. Mary Kate is Alex’s opposite in almost every way, but she called Alex out on her rather narrow view of feminism, which I appreciated. Unfortunately, it didn’t seem to have much of an effect on Alex or cause her pause at all.

The book had a snarky bite to it that many readers will enjoy. While this wasn’t necessarily the book for me, it was well written and I think a large amount of people will really enjoy it.



White Trash Warlock by David R. Slayton- The Write Reads Blog Tour

Not all magicians go to schools of magic.

Adam Binder has the Sight. It’s a power that runs in his bloodline: the ability to see beyond this world and into another, a realm of magic populated by elves, gnomes, and spirits of every kind. But for much of Adam’s life, that power has been a curse, hindering friendships, worrying his backwoods family, and fueling his abusive father’s rage.

Years after his brother, Bobby, had him committed to a psych ward, Adam is ready to come to grips with who he is, to live his life on his terms, to find love, and maybe even use his magic to do some good. Hoping to track down his missing father, Adam follows a trail of cursed artifacts to Denver, only to discover that an ancient and horrifying spirit has taken possession of Bobby’s wife.

It isn’t long before Adam becomes the spirit’s next target. To survive the confrontation, save his sister-in-law, and learn the truth about his father, Adam will have to risk bargaining with very dangerous beings … including his first love. (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to the author and to The Write Reads for allowing me to join this blog tour. It is available for purchase now.

White Trash Warlock is a book that is much bigger than the sum of its parts. Ostensibly about a sort-of warlock on a mission to save his sister-in-law from demonic possession, this book uses that platform to tackle themes of acceptance, grief, anger, and family dynamics.

Adam has stirrings of magic in him. He can see and interact with the spirit world, a talent that got him left in a psych ward as a kid. Now an adult, Adam is happily estranged from his mom and brother Bobby (who committed him to the psych ward years ago), eking out a living and trying to find his missing dad. So, getting a call from Bobby is unusual. Doubly so, when Bobby is asking for help with his wife, who seems to be possessed. Adam decides to drive to Denver, figure out what’s going on with his sister-in-law, and hopefully fix it. Then, he’ll go back to his own life, as far away from his brother as he can get. Unfortunately, things are far less simple than Adam expected.

First, I’ll start with the world building. Denver itself is…Denver, a city like any other. However, layer spirit towers, Reapers, and giant evil thingies over it like tracing paper, and you get the Denver of the book. Think “Upside Down” from Stranger Things, and you have the general idea. It was an intriguing concept, and one that worked quite well, taking the everyday and making it just a little…off. I loved seeing the different worlds cross over, like when a car stolen in the real world is used in the spirit world.

Great plot? Check. Interesting world? Check. Fantastic, complicated characters? Triple check. The characters are what elevated this book from good to amazing for me. There was Bobby, with his perfect little house, his perfect little car, and his perfect little life being upended. He wanted to retreat into the familiar and completely ordinary, but was unable to. He was so lost, and blamed Adam for feeling out of place. That he asked for Adam’s help despite their history and Bobby’s dislike of anything he didn’t understand opened the door to some meaningful interactions between the two. The mom didn’t really figure in all that much, but her additions were interesting. There were a few other characters, two of which I’m not going to name, so as not to spoil anything. I liked them both, especially as ways to further the development in other characters.

Then there’s Adam. I loved Adam so much! He was a mix of emotions and reflex-reactions. He so badly wanted to be seen, yet was afraid for anyone to know the real him. His mix of anger over the past, and the strong desire to avoid dealing with that past felt incredibly authentic. Little details mentioned throughout the book really resonated with me. At one point, Adam gets incredibly annoyed at someone for referring to a mental institution as a “loony bin”, which I was nodding at: I’ve spent time in a mental hospital, and it bothers me when people say things like that too. He was competent and willing to sacrifice everything for a sister-in-law he really didn’t know. I cheered for him from minute one, and wanted him to see his own worth.

The story ratcheted up from a bit of mystery (who was responsible for the possession and why?) to a full-out battle involving manticores, Reapers, and a dragon. I do wish the ending had taken a little longer, just because I was enjoying the book so much. White Trash Warlock was a supernatural show-down combined with complicated real-life problems. I loved it and can’t wait to see what happens next.

Amari and the Night Brothers by B.B. Alston

Artemis Fowl meets Men in Black in this exhilarating debut middle grade fantasy, the first in a trilogy filled with #blackgirlmagic. Perfect for fans of Tristan Strong Punches a Hole in the Sky, the Percy Jackson series, and Nevermoor.

Amari Peters has never stopped believing her missing brother, Quinton, is alive. Not even when the police told her otherwise, or when she got in trouble for standing up to bullies who said he was gone for good.

So when she finds a ticking briefcase in his closet, containing a nomination for a summer tryout at the Bureau of Supernatural Affairs, she’s certain the secretive organization holds the key to locating Quinton—if only she can wrap her head around the idea of magicians, fairies, aliens, and other supernatural creatures all being real.

Now she must compete for a spot against kids who’ve known about magic their whole lives. No matter how hard she tries, Amari can’t seem to escape their intense doubt and scrutiny—especially once her supernaturally enhanced talent is deemed “illegal.” With an evil magician threatening the supernatural world, and her own classmates thinking she’s an enemy, Amari has never felt more alone. But if she doesn’t stick it out and pass the tryouts, she may never find out what happened to Quinton. (Taken from Amazon)

Thank you to The Write Reads for the opportunity to join this book tour. Amari and the Night Brothers is available now.

Oh, how I loved Amari and the Night Brothers! This rollicking supernatural adventure book rivals Harry Potter for excellent world-building, and it has an infinitely more likeable main character. Amari is spunky, intelligent, and wholly original.

When the book opens, Amari is trying to succeed in a school where she’s not wanted while learning to cope with the fact that everyone thinks her missing brother is dead. She refuses to believe it, and when she gets invited to try out for a spot at the Bureau of Supernatural Affairs, she finds herself entering a world she didn’t even know existed in an effort to find him.

And what a world! Were-dragons, illusionists, and even escalators with personalities make appearances. There is never a dull moment, and I loved seeing what new surprise would pop up next. This is a world that I’d love to see more of (luckily, this is a series, so I’ll get to).

The characters were phenomenal. Among the many awesome people, my favorites were Magnus, whose prickly demeanor hides a heart of gold, and Amari herself. She’s the kind of main character that I love to see my children reading about. She is moral, smart, and resourceful. And she persists, no matter what.

The plot is fantastic, with the mystery of Amari’s brother framing a coming-of-age story. There’s adventure galore, but the book also deals with themes that are a little more real-world, like feelings of not fitting in, and the ugly things people see (such as racism). It’s done in a way that is not too much for the intended age group, while also not dumbing things down.

Amari and the Night Brothers is a fantastic fantasy, one that older elementary kids and middle-graders will love. I loved it too. It’s an adventure of the best kind, one that will capture the imagination of anyone who reads it. I was immediately sucked in and I can’t wait to see where the story goes next.

Second Cousin Once Removed by Kenneth L. Toppell- The Write Reads Blog Tour


When Henry Attkinson, divorcee and semi-retired attorney, decided to do
a little research into his family tree, he never expected it to take him on the
adventure of a lifetime. Now, he must unravel the mystery of his strange
second cousin’s past to stay one step ahead of him – and stay alive.
As Henry digs deeper, his predictable life becomes anything but as he begins receiving ominous threats
from his second cousin Shelley and noticing the increasing number of bodies showing up in his wake.
Henry must go on the run, joined by Carolyn Trellis, a woman who stumbled into his life at just the
right – or perhaps wrong -time. Together they must disguise themselves and hop from cities to small
towns along the east coast in an attempt to evade Shelley and pursue justice. Though the chemistry
between them becomes undeniable, Shelley refuses to be forgotten. Henry and Carolyn’s minds and
hearts will be put to the test as they try to untangle Shelley’s past – little do they know they will soon be
facing an even more ruthless villain.
When asked about his writing process, Dr. Toppell stated, “I write without an outline. Therefore, if I
think the story works better in a new direction while I’m writing, I simply go there. I try it out to see
what would catch my reader unaware or surprised.”
Discover the intricate web of mystery and betrayal conjured up by Henry’s seemingly innocuous
genealogy research in Second Cousin Once Removed. With plenty of twists and turns, as well as
Toppell’s dry humor, readers will be engrossed from page one to the end as they try to catch their breath
in this fast-paced, sweaty-palm thriller.


Thank you to the Write Reads for allowing me to be part of the blog tour for this book. It is available for purchase now.

What an interesting premise! The main character in this book is Henry Atkinson, a lawyer who is sort-of retired. He’s looking into his family tree, which ends up being the catalyst for all kinds of trouble. Henry’s second cousin, Shelley, sends some threats and the next thing he knows, Henry finds himself on the run. Enter Carolyn, a woman who gets tangled up in everything at a very inopportune time. She ends up fleeing a dastardly villain along with Henry. Can they survive long enough to bring the bad guy to justice?

The story is told from multiple points of view. That makes me nervous in thrillers, but it works out well in Second Cousin Once Removed. The book moves at a fast clip, and there’s never a boring moment. In fact, it moves quickly enough that the relationship between Henry and Carolyn felt…weird. It didn’t develop so much as pop up out of nowhere. That was just a little blip in the story to me, though, and not enough to dull my enjoyment of the book.

The plot was incredibly unique and well thought out. Who would have thought that genealogy could be so rife with danger? I really liked the pacing of the story, and Henry’s character was a blast to read. If you want a quick, entertaining thriller, pick this book up.


The Marriage of Innis Wilkinson by Lauren H. Brandenburg- Blog Tour

It is said that something magical happens during the festival season in Coraloo, something unexplainable. People tend to be a little crazier, reckless. Maybe it’s because it coincides the full moon, but Coraloo’s constable, Roy Blackwell, is beginning to think it’s something else. That said, Roy has other things on his mind, like marrying Margarette Toft. A controversial decision as the Toft and the Blackwell families have a hatred for one another that is older than the town itself. Tradition collides with superstition as the feuding families compete to organize the events surrounding the most talked about wedding in the history of Coraloo. Despite the array of minor catastrophes that ensue, and the timings clashing with a four-week long festival celebrating a legendary beaver, Roy and Margarette hold fast and declare they will do whatever it takes to wed. That is until Roy unearths a town secret – a murder involving a pair of scissors, an actor with a severe case of kleptomania, and the mysterious marriage of Innis Wilkinson. Can good come out of unearthing the past – or will only heartbreak follow? (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to Lion Hudson for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. I must say, I’m incredibly excited to be a part of this blog tour. This book will be available on October twenty third.

The Marriage of Innis Wilkinson is heartwarming, funny, and delightful. Imagine scooping up the zany background characters from the show Gilmore Girls, along with an adorable and kooky town, and making them the main focus of a book, and you’ve got this sweet and funny romp.

Margarette is engaged to marry Roy. However, there’s a big problem: she’s a Toft and he’s a Blackwell. These families have been at each other’s throats for as long as anyone can remember and no wedding is going to change that. This is a feud of Shakespearean proportions, and if Margarette and Roy aren’t careful, it could end just as badly. Meanwhile, the town might have seen its first murder in memory, someone has stolen the recipe to the incredibly potent communion wine and is spiking drinks left and right, and a little elementary school student is predicting doom at every turn. Can Margarette and Roy manage to survive all the feud-related nonsense, or will their wedding go the way of the dodo?

I don’t think there’s a single thing that I didn’t love about this book! The setting- a small town with a weeks’ long festival- is a perfect backdrop for the hijinks the characters get into. Everyone knows everyone, which makes the small town seem even smaller. The two feuding families couldn’t be more different, with everyone on one side or the other. The only thing they agree on is that Tofts and Blackwells shouldn’t marry.

And the characters! The Marriage of Innis Wilkinson is chock-full of wonderful, zany people. From Sylvia, the hairdresser whose clients have to get their hair fixed by someone else afterward, to Earl, who always has a colander on his head, each one of them is a fun addition to the book. The way their personalities play off each other and add to the general zaniness of the story is utterly fantastic.

While there are mysterious goings-on that need to be solved, the main charm of this book is in the character development and the sweetness that shines through each page. This is a perfect cozy read. Cuddle up with your favorite warm beverage and get ready to laugh, smile, and leave the stresses of the real world behind for a bit. The Marriage of Innis Wilkinson is a hug in book form and I loved every moment of it.