An Author’s Monster Manual Featuring Andi Ewington

One of the great things about playing TTRPGs is that you never know what sort of unique creature might show up during a gaming session. Of course, we all enjoy the classics: dragons or ogres, but sometimes it’s fun to see something a little more…unique.

Author Andi Ewington is an expert at putting new, creative twists on fantasy. His soon-to-be-released book, The Hero Interviews, takes classic fantasy and shines a comedic light on it.

Here, he shares his STAT Block on the fantasy favorite, the Behol—wait, the Behearer???

Bewarned, brave adventurer, for there is a foe more dangerous than any found within these ancient pages, a monster so terrible that it strikes fear into the hearts of the bravest Paladins, the hardiest Barbarians and the most cowardly of Clerics. Whisper its name and pray the Behearer is not listening.

Behearers are notoriously grumpy creatures, a literal ‘ball’ of ears that has a gigantic central ear surrounded by smaller tentacled ears around it. As you can imagine, the Behearer can hear EVERYTHING, from the soft footfalls of a Rogue to the heavy clanks of an over-encumbered Fighter noisily crashing about. As a result, it’s not uncommon for a wandering Behearer to silently float up to an unsuspecting adventurer and ask them politely to keep the noise down a bit. More often than not, it’s this unexpected polite request that results in a full-blown noisy confrontation—with plenty of ‘shhhing’ added for good measure.

A legendary monster that surpasses all others, the Behearer is a monster that simply wants a bit of peace and quiet—which is exactly what an adventuring party is not!

To pre-order The Hero Interviews:
Amazon UK
Amazon U.S.

About the author:

Andi Ewington is a writer who has written numerous titles including Campaigns & Companions, Forty-Five45, S6X, Sunflower, Red Dog, Dark Souls II, Just Cause 3, Freeway Fighter, and Vikings. Andi lives in Surrey, England with his wife, two children and a plethora of childhood RPGs and ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ gamebooks he refuses to part with. He’s usually found on Twitter as @AndiEwington

Bewitching Book Tours Cover Reveal & Excerpt: Midnight on the Manatee by D.H. Willison

Today I’m excited to be joining Bewitching Books Tours in sharing the cover for D.H. Willison’s new book, Midnight on the Manatee. D.H. Willison’s new release will feature adventure, romance, and a whole lot of humor.

Book Description:

How does the steamship Manatee navigate sea-monster infested waters? What sacrifices do her grand profits demand? The only certainty, is that the Manatee casts a dark shadow everywhere she makes port.


Brianna, a tough, no-nonsense human, yearns to escape stifling big city rules and a troubled past. A quaint seaside town seems perfect to start a new life—until she wakes up aboard the Manatee. As cargo.


Shard, nekojin feline of the forest, dreams of sailing to distant lands—to the horror of his friends. When his intriguing new neighbor, Brianna, disappears and all signs point to the mysterious Manatee, he’s certain this is his moment for high seas adventure. Yet with skills tailored to the forest canopy, his rescue goes disastrously awry.


Their only chance of freedom is to work together, but can their budding relationship overcome ruthless smugglers, corrupt officials, and a slew of ravenous monsters? Or are they destined to take the secret of the Manatee to a watery grave?


Midnight on the Manatee blends life-and-death adventures on a creepy fantasy world with wit, whimsy, and a generous dash of romance.

Are you ready to see the cover? Here it is!

Wow!


Genre: Fantasy adventure/fantasy romance
Date of Publication: October 28, 2022
ISBN: 9798823112536
Number of pages: 182
Word Count: 33K
Cover Artist: Papaya-style

Life-and-death adventures on a creepy fantasy world blend with wit, whimsy, and a generous dash of romance.

Excerpt:

Brianna

I’ve always struggled picking out clothes. It doesn’t matter if it’s for travel, work, or a special event, I seem to hit a point where I regret my choices.

Like today.

Late afternoon sun glared in my eyes, the wide brim of my slouch hat unable to shield me. Mostly because it was on the ground a dozen paces distant. It was hot, and this close to the marsh, humid too. My linen blouse was drenched in sweat, though a breeze provided a modicum of relief from the heat—that part, I’d gotten right. The leather traveling vest was well-vented, my padded breeches also a good compromise between comfort and protection. But my boots were clearly wrong. Light beige leather with flexible soles prioritizing comfort over armor seemed a good idea for the long trek between Halamar and Barricayde.

But the bog toad with its jaws locked around my right ankle seemed intent on demonstrating the error of my ways.

It was half the size of a coach, with an underbite and stubby tusks thick as my legs. I kicked it with my free foot as it shambled backwards, dragging me toward the marsh. Vision blurry from sweat streaming into my eyes, I squinted, trying to sight along the barrel of my single shot pistol.

One shot. At this range I can’t miss.

I fired, the pistol belching gray smoke and a dull wumm.

The toad lurched back, blood oozing from an apparently non-critical wound. It blinked a pair of fist-sized ruby eyes, lunged at me again, this time snapping both legs up to my knees in a maw as broad as my arm span.

How did I let a minor predator ambush me? Along a marked path! Big city’s making me soft.

No! I will not die to an oversized frog. I shoved the pistol in its holster, unfolded my collapsible spear with a metallic klink, jabbed it at the creature’s head. A head which seemed to comprise half its mass. The third strike to its thick hide found a sensitive spot: it spat out my legs, sneezed a blob of mucus and blood on me, and shambled back into the marsh.

“Oww. Filthy beast. That hurt.”

I stood, yelped in pain, collapsing to my knees again.

Those critters might not have sharp teeth, but they bite hard.

First things first: I reloaded my pistol. It may have been as effective as poking a troll with a toothpick, but it was my toothpick, and it was gonna be loaded.

I pulled off boots caked with blood and saliva to reveal a souvenir of the encounter: bruises from ankle to mid thigh.

Should have worn armored boots. Blood or mucus colored armored boots would have been ideal. But on the bright side, none of the blood was mine.

“It’s a well-traveled path. You can wear comfortable traveling clothes, no need for armor.

Owww. You’re an idiot, Brianna,” I muttered, managing to stay up on the next attempt.

“Hope they have a decent healer in Barricayde. Not to mention a laundry.”

Shard

Murky water burned my eyes as my feet sank into the mud. The caprid in my arms flailed and kicked, I could feel its chest heave in panicked breaths. “Juro, a little help?” I called.

“I am helping. I’m watching out for predators.” Juro crouched atop a low branch of a live oak tree, gaze darting between trees and clumps of reeds. He grinned. “None here. You’re welcome.”

“I meant, could you grab the other two trapped caprids.”

“Theoretically, I could.”

I waded ashore, set the waist-high, hoofed creature next to its flockmates, hoping the presence of the herd would calm it.

“At least keep the flock from panicking while I get the other two.”

Juro bounded from branch to branch, finally settling on the ground beside me. He had auburn fur, stood a tad shorter than me, his tail shorter as well, and lacking the white puffy tip he made fun of when we were growing up.

“If we leave them out here,” he said, “our neighbors might learn a valuable lesson about the merits of proper animal husbandry.”

“The creatures horns are blunted, they cannot defend themselves against predators and would most likely be devoured by bog toads before the humans were able to recover them all.”

“Which would certainly be a valuable lesson, Shard. Hurt what they value most.”

Juro didn’t need to complete the thought. We all knew what that was. “It would indeed hurt their coin purse, but caprids shouldn’t pay the price to do so. The creatures are innocent.”

“Didn’t you want to visit the bookseller this afternoon? New volume of that pirate series you’re always talking about.”

I dove back into the stagnant green-brown murk at the edge of the marsh, swam around the last two stragglers, managing to shoo them toward the herd without having to carry them.

I spat, trying to clear the taste of marsh water from my mouth. Mud, slimy strands of algae, and decaying vegetation plugged my nose, clung to my ears, obscured my normally keen senses. But I wasn’t worried, Juro was a rascal, but he’d have my back at the first hint of danger.

“Yes. It’s supposed to be out today. But after all that effort, we can’t leave the task unfinished.”

Juro shrugged, but helped guide the flock toward the shepherd’s day shed.

We encountered the herder’s daughter a few minutes later, sprinting toward us, a wooden crook in her hands, single shot rifle slung across her back.

“You’ve found them, thank you!” She huffed heavily, her armor and gear sized more for an adult human than an early teen.

“That’s the third time this month,” said Juro.

She mumbled, pointed at the creatures with an index finger as she counted. “All here. My stupid little brother needed help with…” She shook her head. “It’s not important. I’d like to thank you, but I don’t have my coin purse with me. Come with me to the day shed, maybe there’s something there.”

“It’s OK,” I said. “I’m still hoping to make it to the bookseller today.”
Juro snorked. “Looking like that? The humans won’t even let you through the city gate! You’ll be lucky if they don’t mistake you for a swamp monster and hunt you.”

“Good point.” I turned to the girl. “How about a few buckets of fresh water, some rags, and a brush?”

She smiled. “Deal.” She moved to clap me on the shoulder, hesitated, backed off half a step. “Maybe after a bath.”

About the Author:

D.H. Willison is a reader, writer, game enthusiast and developer, engineer, and history buff. He’s lived or worked in over a dozen countries, learning different cultures, viewpoints, and attitudes, which have influenced his writing, contributing to one of his major themes: alternate and creative conflict resolution. The same situations can be viewed by different cultures quite differently. Sometimes it leads to conflict, sometimes to hilarity. Both make for a great story.


He’s also never missed a chance to visit historic sites, from castle dungeons, to catacombs, to the holds of tall ships, to the tunnels of the Maginot Line. It might be considered research, except for the minor fact that his tales are all set on the whimsical and terrifying world of Arvia. Where giant mythic monsters are often more easily overcome with empathy than explosions.


Subscribe to his newsletter for art, stories, and humorous articles (some of which are actually intended to be humorous).

Blog: https://dhwillisoncreates.com/blog/

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Twitter: https://twitter.com/dhwillison
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How does the steamship Manatee navigate sea-monster infested waters? Brianna and Shard find out, but will they take the secret to a watery grave? Life-and-death adventures on a creepy, monster infested world blend with wit, whimsy and romance. https://dhwillisoncreates.com/   

The Hero Interviews by Andi Ewington

Following Elburn Barr, a Loremaster (think reporter) as he interviews adventurers far and wide, The Hero Interviews by Andi Ewington doesn’t just poke a little fun at common fantasy tropes. Instead, it chases them down, beats them up, then goes through their pockets for loose change. It is a brilliantly funny book and one that had me laughing from start to finish. Grab a tankard for the road and follow the Loremaster as he tries to figure out what makes heroes tick!

I’ve read The Hero Interviews multiple times now and I find something new that makes me laugh every single time. The main character, Elburn, who sees a paper and quill as his weapons rather than a sword, is a delightful character. His parents and brother all did the hero thing, and he just can’t figure out the draw. He’s full of piss and vinegar, which comes out in the most hilarious of ways.

There is an ongoing mocking- ahem, inner monologue- from Elburn in the form of footnotes added to each interview. The snark is strong in him, and the footnotes elevate The Hero Interviews from funny to rolling-on-the-floor hilarious.

The subjects of the interviews include socially awkward skulls, barbarians who punch themselves to see if they’re dreaming (“Rogues pinch. Barbarians punch.”), wizards who may have accidentally killed entire adventuring parties with ill-times spells, and much more. I was floored by the creativity of each interview and how incredibly different and unique each character is from the others.

There is a storyline throughout the book as well, weaving seemingly disparate interviews into a cohesive whole. While he is compiling interviews, Elburn is also on a quest to find his missing heroic brother (although he’d balk at the word “quest”). His character develops and grows, in-between mocking observations about oddball interviewees.

The Hero Interviews had me snorting with laughter (it was not a pretty sight, let me tell you). It is easily one of the funniest books I’ve ever read, and I loved every minute of it. The Hero Interviews should come with a warning: will cause side-splitting laughter.

About the author:

Andi Ewington is a writer who has written numerous titles beyondThe Hero Interviews, including Campaigns & Companions, Forty-Five45, S6X, Sunflower, Red Dog, Dark Souls II, Just Cause 3, Freeway Fighter, and Vikings. Andi lives in Surrey, England with his wife, two children and a plethora of childhood RPGs and ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ gamebooks he refuses to part with. He’s usually found on Twitter as @AndiEwington.

Andi is querying right now. Interested publishers can reach him at butwin@me.com or on Twitter.

Cover Reveal- The Hero Interviews by Andi Ewington

I am beyond excited to share the cover of The Hero Interviews, a book that had me laughing out loud. Perfect for fans of Dungeons and Dragons or lovers of fantasy in general, The Hero Interviews pokes loving fun at all things fantasy. To say that I loved it would be an understatement.

So, what is The Hero Interviews about? I’ll let author Andi Ewington explain more.

Heroes…you can’t swing a cat without hitting one. You can’t even hatch a nefarious plan without some adventuring party invading your dungeon to thwart you. So, it stands to reason they’re a force for good-right?

Well- yes and no. The Hero Interviews is a departure from the usual swords and sorcery yarn- It’s a sometimes gritty, sometimes amusing but completely bonkers look at the realm of heroes.

We are following in the footsteps of Elburn Barr, a Loremaster who has turned his back on his family’s tradition of adventuring and instead decided to write a journal about heroes and everything associated with them. Readers are treated to 45 transcribed interviews with heroes, guild masters, merchants, witnesses and villains. Each interview connects- leaving a breadcrumb trail of clues that, when stitched together, reveal a bigger truth about the realm of heroes (and get to the bottom of his adventuring brother’s mysterious disappearance).

The incredible cover is created the extremely talented artist, Conor Nolan. Are you ready to see the amazing cover? Here it is!

About the author:

Andi Ewington is a writer who has written numerous titles beyondThe Hero Interviews, including Campaigns & Companions, Forty-Five45, S6X, Sunflower, Red Dog, Dark Souls II, Just Cause 3, Freeway Fighter, and Vikings. Andi lives in Surrey, England with his wife, two children and a plethora of childhood RPGs and ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ gamebooks he refuses to part with. He’s usually found on Twitter as @AndiEwington.

Andi is querying right now. Interested publishers can reach him at butwin@me.com or on Twitter.

Why Odin Drinks by Bjørn Larssen

Norse Mythology retelling for fans of Terry Pratchett, Douglas Adams, Calvin & Hobbes
Ever woken up being a God, but not knowing how to God properly? Poor Odin must restrain his brothers, who create offensive weapons such as mosquitoes and celery; placate his future-telling wife, Frigg, who demands sweatpants with pockets; listen to Loki’s Helpful Questions; hang himself from Yggdrasil for nine days with a spear through his side (as you do); teach everyone about nutritional values of kale (but NOT celery); meet a Wise Dom, Sir Daddy Mímir, in order to outwit those who outwit him; and, most importantly, prove he is The All-Father, while his brothers are, at best, Those-Uncles-We-Don’t-Talk-About.

This nearly (except in Vanaheim) universally acclaimed retelling of the Gods’ first millennium answers way too many questions, including ones on Freyr’s entendre, horse designing… and why Odin drinks. (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to the author for providing me a copy of this book. Why Odin Drinks is available now.

I’m very particular about my comedy. I like witty, I like a little bit of line-blurring, and I like smart. And yes, while a person might not expect a book that features the creation (and subsequent why?) of celery to be particularly clever, Why Odin Drinks is also incredibly smart.

Author Bjørn Larssen explores Norse mythology as you’ve never seen it. From a creation story that’s a bit more haphazard than your usual fare, to the addition of a prescient wife and the difficulties that comes with it, and of course the World Tree, Larssen adds a brilliantly comedic twist to well-known mythologies.

My reaction to Why Odin Drinks ranged from giggles to flat-out obnoxious guffaws. A fast read, it was also surprisingly deep. l was fortunate to be able to interview Bjørn and he said that Why Odin Drinks has a serious undertone that you can choose to miss. I would add the word “wise” to that description. Like Calvin and Hobbes, another comedy with serious aspects to it, Why Odin Drinks muses on life and humanity in ways that are accessible and undeniably smart. There were several “whoa” moments, when I wondered if maybe it was Larssen and not Frigg, who sees the future.

Why Odin Drinks left me gasping with laughter while also thinking. I’m sure I looked ridiculous. Read the book with a tissue or two handy- whether you snort your drink out your nose while laughing, or you tear up a little at some of the observations hidden beneath the surface, that tissue will come in handy.

Fantasy Focus: Comedic Fantasy- Featuring D.H. Willison

This week I’m focusing on comedic fantasy, that subgenre that reminds a person that not everything in life is horrible. D.H. Willison, author of several comedic fantasy novels, discusses humor in fantasy.

Hello! I’m D.H. Willison, and I love writing (and reading) humorous fantasy. Why? In contrast to real life, you never have to be funny on cue. Which I rarely am. Also you can edit. A lot.

Something many people may not realize about humorous fantasy is that there are different styles. In the before times, were you ever in a movie theater, broke out laughing, and realized you were the only one? I had a horribly embarrassing situation when I was on a long flight while sitting next to a rather elegant and proper individual. Who was very nice–we had a great conversation. Then as I was watching a film, I broke out laughing. And it was… well… not a particularly sophisticated scene I was laughing at. The individual in question was mortified. But I couldn’t stop laughing. Welcome to my life.

The point is, not everyone finds the same things funny, so as you learn about the various authors who feature comedic/humorous fantasy during this event, keep in mind that even within this admittedly very niche genre, there may be some that work for you, while others do not.

So what’s my style? Extreme and often outlandish situations, coupled with a diverse cast of characters. My world of Arvia is populated by giant mythical monsters, while my human characters are frequently marginally competent at best. Some of the mythic monsters are POV characters with vastly different perspectives and cultures than human norms. So you’ll find a lot of “throwing wildly different characters into a strange scene, and letting the sparks fly.”

Here’s an example. In this scene, Rinloh, a 35’ tall harpy, tries so very hard to make small talk with a pair of human villagers after mistaking their donkey for a light snack.


I see that I managed to surprise the two humans that were with this creature. A female human with long black hair in a single braid down her back, and an off-white cotton dress, has her back against the nearby willow tree, while the male, with light-brown hair and a maroon tunic, is on his back staring up at me. Oops. I might have accidentally knocked him over. But fortunately it looks like I didn’t hurt him.

“Please don’t kill our donkey,” the young male squeaks.

“A donkey? Is that what these things are called? Hmm… OK, but it looks far too large for you to eat. And why do you have it tied to the box? To keep it from getting away?”

“I… no… you see…”

The young male doesn’t seem very coherent, so maybe I’ll talk to the female human. Hmm. This “donkey” shouldn’t be able to get very far tied to the box, as long as I break off these pesky wheels to prevent it from rolling. I put it down, and can chase it again later if need be. I hop closer to the female, to see if she is able to talk any better than that male. Hey! This is the perfect time for me to practice speaking “human.” Darin told me all about the funny human greetings and customs and such. If I do it right, maybe she will be friendly and want to play with me! Let’s see if I can remember. He said it was considered rude to speak to someone if you are too far away. And when introducing yourself, it was best to tell them your name, and something about yourself.

I hop over to the willow tree that the female human has her back against, lean over so that my face is about at her level, and say in my friendliest voice, “Hi, I’m Rinloh, and I’m looking for something to eat.”

She just stares back at me with a strange look of terror in her eyes. Hmm. Maybe I didn’t remember the introduction correctly. Or perhaps I’m not close enough and I’m being rude. I need to think like a human. I had my face at the correct distance if we were both big, so let me lean in farther so that my face is about one of her arm’s lengths away. There, that’s the right distance for a human—she should feel more comfortable now!

She’s still just sitting there shaking and won’t respond. What am I doing wrong? Wait! She’s female. Darin said that human females like it if you compliment them. Maybe she’ll want to be friends with me if I compliment her.

“You look good!” I say, with a wide, friendly grin.

She starts crying. Now I feel bad. It’s hard to believe that Darin would be wrong about human greetings. Maybe they do it differently in this village.


That was just a misunderstanding, but one of the joys for me is if I’m able to blend a subtle social commentary, or get readers to look at things from a different perspective. The thing about fantasy humor is that it’s often not just about the humor. It’s about something else too. And it’s the incorporation of that something else that’s both rewarding and challenging. I often touch on themes of empathy, how people treat others, especially people (or creatures) they consider “lesser beings.”

A lot of things on my world are specifically designed to subvert some of the common fantasy tropes. Arvia is a dangerous world full of strange creatures, gnomes, elves, cat people, talking rodents, and all sorts of mythical creatures that are almost exclusively larger than humans. But many are not mindless beasts–they belong to whole societies of monsters, have their own issues and insecurities. So diplomacy and understanding tend to go a lot further than swords and fireballs. And there the fun begins.

Which brings me to one of the big challenges: striking the right balance between humor, and all of the other things that go into one of my stories. Have I made a scene too outlandish? Diminished the impact of a dramatic moment? But most importantly, are the characters still being themselves: conveying genuine emotions is my highest goal–I need them to feel like living, breathing people (or harpies, or mermen) with unique desires, fears, insecurities. And any humor should enhance this.

So, if I’m not able to be funny on cue, how do I go about it? Sometimes I have an idea for a scene or chapter that’s hilarious on the first draft, but a lot of my ideas trickle in after I let a work stew for a while. I tend to have a long edit cycle, and frequently come up with a new (and amusing) way to look at a particular situation. And finally, I love Easter eggs, references to characters in other media and other fun little details that perhaps not every reader would get at a first glance. Look closely, and you’ll find references to everything from classic mythology, to modern SFF, manga, and games both video and table top. Such as the LOTR quip in the map below (from Hazelhearth Hires Heroes).

Will my humorous fantasies tickle your funny bone? All of my books are heavily character-driven, with witty banter, and quite a bit of adventuring.

Hazelhearth Hires Heroes (hardcover here) is more of a classic tale of adventure with themes of trust, loyalty and found family. What, and for whom would you risk your life? Would they do the same for you? Does it matter?

The Tales of Arvia series (hardcovers here) is more relationship driven, or as one reviewer put it, “a quirky, strange, yet beautiful friendship and the exploration of the way we can be different, and yet still understand and love one another.” There are two books in the series, with a third being drafted.

And if you’re on the fence, why not take a free test drive. The first three chapters (no cliffhangers, promise!) of Love, Death, or Mermaid? are available here. This novella is a shorter adventure, featuring the search for lost pirate treasure, a not-so-little mermaid, and a cute, sweet romance.

Wishing everybody a brighter 2022!

About the author:

D.H. Willison is a reader, writer, game enthusiast and developer, engineer, and history buff. He’s lived or worked in over a dozen countries, learning different cultures, viewpoints, and attitudes, which have influenced his writing, contributing to one of his major themes: alternate and creative conflict resolution. The same situations can be viewed by different cultures quite differently. Sometimes it leads to conflict, sometimes to hilarity. Both make for a great story.

He’s also never missed a chance to visit historic sites, from castle dungeons, to catacombs, to the holds of tall ships, to the tunnels of the Maginot Line. It might be considered research, except for the minor fact that his tales are all set on the whimsical and terrifying world of Arvia. Where giant mythic monsters are often more easily overcome with empathy than explosions.

Subscribe to his newsletter for art, stories, and humorous articles (some of which are actually intended to be humorous).

Fantasy Focus: Comedic Fantasy- Featuring Bjørn Larssen 

This week on Witty and Sarcastic Bookclub, I’m focusing on comedic fantasy! There is such a broad range, and the creativity of comedic authors is boundless. Bjørn Larssen, author of Why Odin Drinks, has kindly shared his time and expertise on comedy, Norse mythology, and feather dusters.
I would also like to thank Sue Bavey for her suggestions and help with this interview.

Thank you so much for chatting about comedic fantasy with me! Would you introduce yourself to the readers?

I’m the sort of person who immediately blanks when asked to say something about himself. (My grandma used to ask me to say “something” in Dutch and I would immediately forget the entire language. Including the word for “something.”) I’m an ex-mathematician (that’s stretching the truth, I have a degree, though); ex-graphic designer; ex-blacksmith; currently a recovering perfectionist, a Norse heathen, and a writer.

Can you talk a little bit about ‘Why Odin Drinks’? 

In the beginning there was confusion… in the shape(s) of Gods who have been tasked with everything, but received no instruction manuals. They don’t know what they can do until it’s done, and only one of them is vaguely aware of the idea of “consequences.” With great power comes great responsibility, but that’s a way too long word to think of when this floozie Freya wears a miniskirt and you don’t even have sweatpants.

The idea actually came from my dark fantasy book, Children – which is also funny, although the dark and the light are balanced differently. Gods having to figure out their powers by trial and error. That would explain a lot about the world, like for instance why celery exists.

To say that you are knowledgeable about Norse mythology would be an enormous understatement. What made you decide to bring the comedic element into ‘Why Odin Drinks’?

The Northmen never had a Holy Book – they had drunken bards. The Norse Gods made mistakes, cheated, lied, stole, or worse – lost… and those who listened to those stories gasped, cried, slammed their fists on the tables, and laughed their bellies off. Those are not “do this or else” stories – they’re “they did this and you won’t believe what happened next” ones. So I didn’t bring the comedic element into it, I just emphasised it.

(Thor would like everyone to know that he has never agreed to wear a dressing gown to recover his hammer by marrying a jötunn king. He is the most hurt by the suggestion that when the king looked under the veil Thor’s rage-filled eyes scared him, though. Thor’s beautiful eyes were in fact full of peace and compassion for the soon-to-be-massacred court of the king. Or rather would be, had this not been a filthy lie, probably made up by his Twitter haters.)

Is it difficult to write characters that are already established in a way that fleshes them out differently and shows a new aspect that does not already exist?

Yes. Certain aspects are locked in place. For instance, Týr has his hand bitten off by Fenrir wolf and I can’t really make that funny. I can make the act Týr’s idea and give him agency, nevertheless it must happen. I call this a pinch. I’ve read other authors’ books that are spun around retellings of myths and often the myths themselves are the weakest parts. It’s difficult when you have an act that must happen or a characteristic that must be there – in the middle of the very different story you’re actually trying to tell.

I try to go around as many of those as I can, and I make smaller, less consequential changes to the Norse lore. For instance, in Why Odin Drinks Frigg, Odin’s wife and Goddess who can foretell the future, finds out that she is going to remain childless. She is the Norse mother figure, though, and according to the Eddas Frigg and Odin did have children together. So now I lock things in place. I have an explanation why the Northmen called Frigg “mother” – that’s what the story is about. I pinched myself now, though. If any of Frigg’s and Odin’s children must appear in a book ten years from now, I better have a very good origin story for them.

I am not incredibly well-versed in Norse mythology, but I do know that certain comic book characters share the names of well-known Norse characters, but they don’t share much else. Do you think the current pop-culture expectations for those characters and mythologies make it more difficult to write about them? 

This is a very good way of phrasing it – they “share the names” indeed. MarvelTM introduced the idea of Father, Son, and the Naughty Ghost, where Odin basically delegates tasks and Loki is a bit of the Fallen Angel But Cute. What they did was an unconscious (apparently) attempt to translate a polytheist faith for people used to monotheism, and it worked too well. The real Thor is not Goody-Two-Shoes-With-Great-Pecs, Odin is not God Almighty, and Loki is not Handsome Devil. So I have to remember I am dealing with those expectations and do it without “…and now we interrupt for this scholarly explanation…”

The humour itself is difficult, because it evolves. Most retellings, such as Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology, are limited to the myths that are easiest to adapt to modern sensitivities (and therefore best known). I wrote about The Lay of Harbard for Norsevember and I was surprised at how, frankly, rape-y some of it is. “I made them all submit to my will,” Harbard (Odin) says, “I could have used your help, Thor, you could have helped me hold that gorgeous girl down.” “I would have helped you,” Thor answers, “if I had been there.” This was probably amusing in the 9th century, but there is no way to twist it so that it’s funny in the 2020s. I’m not surprised most writers, including myself, stay away from it. Can’t imagine MarvelTM touching it with a long pole, either.

You introduce the idea of bigotry among the humans, with some thinking they are better than others. Do you think it is important to have a message in your writing, even in comedy?

My biggest inspiration is Calvin & Hobbes, where the characters’ personalities are informed by the works of the theologian John Calvin and philosopher Thomas Hobbes. Those strips often work on multiple levels. They’re funny because Calvin is wearing rocket underpants and simultaneously argues with Hobbes about what constitutes happiness or what man does to nature – in one panel with two sentences on it. They shape the reader’s subconsciousness without slamming them on the head with The Message.

I have my agenda and I have my politics, and there are things I want to talk about, but I also know that people don’t like being yelled at or be told they’re dumb and need to “educate themselves.” Humour is a very powerful weapon. There are jokes in Why Odin Drinks that are just silly and nothing more, and then there are others that smuggle my thoughts about, well, bigotry or sexism or tribalism or basic human traits. It’s funny because it’s true.

In one of the stories in ‘Why Odin Drinks’, I believe one of the characters is portrayed as a dominatrix. How sexual is the humor in that book?

It’s much worse than that! First we meet the dominatrix, Madame A, then the Wise Dom from the cover, Sir Daddy Mímir. Madame A’s favourite, ah… tools, or perhaps her clients’, are an egg whisker and a feather duster. I stole those, I mean – found inspiration in the old TV series ‘Allo ‘Allo. There’s nothing you can call explicit, yet I try to examine why people engage in BDSM without using either the acronym or explaining what it means.

Odin’s visit to Sir Daddy Mímir is my look at dom/sub relationships. The All-Father has to find something special to offer Sir Daddy (and he has to squeeze the word “Sir” out in the first place) to get what he wants. At the same time, Mímir is genuinely concerned about Odin. Odin will lose an eye (that’s another pinch) but that doesn’t mean Mímir actually wants it to happen, and he is more shocked than Odin himself when it does. I can’t remember whether there is anything actually sexual in the story. The word “seductively” appears, though.

I apply the Shrek rules here. A 13-year-old reading Why Odin Drinks will understand something very different from a 30-year-old, and it’s the latter who might be shocked by my audacity. (Although now that Internet exists, I am probably very naive about 13-year-olds.) I’m actually a prude. I feel very uncomfortable writing about sex, so I write around it, sort of.

What would you say are some of the obstacles to writing comedic fantasy?

It’s actually really hard to be funny without overdoing it, or making it too on-the-nose, even though the latter is something satire is supposed to do. Some people will laugh at “peeing dispensers” in Creation, the first story in Why Odin Drinks – some will be disgusted. The former might not appreciate the Douglas Adams inspirations, though, while the latter will sigh in relief. My sense of humour is also seriously weird. My editor sometimes marks something that I think is hilarious and comments simply “?”

I have once watched a Joan Rivers documentary showing her enormous collection of index cards with one-off jokes she came up with. I also write those things down. I use memes and build around them, but the story still needs to be funny for people who don’t even know what a meme is.

There is this episode of Monty Python where the British come up with a joke so funny it makes the German soldiers die from laughing so hard. The joke finally makes its way to one of the highest rank officers, whose face goes puce as he snarls “das is nicht funny!” I have to remember that when someone scoffs at how super nicht funny my writing is.

What is the best thing about writing comedic fantasy?

Laughing at things that are not supposed to be laughed at. 

I have lived through the final years of communism in Poland. No matter what the church-pleasing politicians would want you to believe, communism has fallen because there was no food. You can live without freedom, you can’t live without food. There was a movie director, Stanisław Bareja, who managed to make that funny. His humour was so subtle that it got past the censors, because they knew he was doing something they should demand he changes, but they couldn’t figure out what. It was the humour that carried the people though those years.

2020/2021 have been… not hilarious. I can either sit here and cry my eyes out (I do sometimes) or laugh. It’s not going to change a thing, but I will feel better. When in October 2020 I published Children, which is dark, psychological fantasy, I peppered it with humour that some found inappropriate – most readers thanked me for it, though. It gave them that breath of fresh air. Why Odin Drinks is the opposite, all of the inappropriate humour with serious undertone you can choose to miss.

In a way writing comedic fantasy is my refusal to let the *gestures at everything* get to me.  I’m going to create my world, my hapless Gods, then laugh at all that even though *gestures at everything* is literally trying to kill me. My naked emperor will uncontrollably salivate at the words “feather duster” and “egg whisker.”

How would you say you “get in the zone” regarding your creative process, and comedic writing in particular? 

Randomly. I try to have a routine, sit in my little indoors cabin (longer story) and get In The Zone. There are times, though, when I’m just too tired or depressed to be creative at all, much less funny. This is why I reject the “write every day” advice – if I tried to force it, 1) I would just feel even worse about myself, and 2) you’d notice. Sometimes, though – this mostly happens either at 2am or in the shower, which is why I have a waterproof phone – I’ll have the electric jolt of an idea. (This is dangerous when you’re in the shower.) The zone pulls me in.

Do you have anything on the horizon that you’d like to talk about?

The follow-up, What Odin Drinks, will explain the origin of wine – and how Thor ended up with both a wife and a lover, neither of whom is too chuffed about the other’s existence. Unfortunately, I also came up with a new oooh, shiny. Typo! A new project. Some people know that I’ve actually always wanted to write rom-coms and always failed. Romance is a very difficult genre to write. I got much better at writing, though (I think) so I’m trying again and it looks promising. Being me, I’m tackling difficult themes again, but being me, I’ll also find a way to make it funny. There will be Iceland, there might be a fantasy element here or there, and someone will be hapless enough to search for a waterfall and find an admittedly impressive puddle. Which might or might not be based on personal experience.

Thank you so much for having me!

About the author:

Bjørn Larssen is a Norse heathen made in Poland, but mostly located in a Dutch suburb, except for his heart which he lost in Iceland. Born in 1977, he self-published his first graphic novel at the age of seven in a limited edition of one, following this achievement several decades later with his first book containing multiple sentences and winning awards he didn’t design himself. His writing is described as ‘dark’ and ‘literary’, but he remains incapable of taking anything seriously for more than 60 seconds.

Bjørn has a degree in mathematics and has worked as a graphic designer, a model, a bartender, and a blacksmith (not all at the same time). His hobbies include sitting by open fires, dressing like an extra from Vikings, installing operating systems, and dreaming about living in a log cabin in the north of Iceland. He owns one (1) husband and is owned by one (1) neighbourhood cat.

Readers’ Favorite Gold Medal winner (‘Storytellers’)

2020 Stabby Award Nominee (‘Children’)

Find out more about Bjørn at http://www.bjornlarssen.com

Social media

www.twitter.com/bjornlarssen
www.instagram.com/bjorn_larssen
www.facebook.com/bjornlarssenwriter

To Purchase:

Separate books:
https://books2read.com/storytellers
https://books2read.com/larssen-children
https://books2read.com/whyodindrinks

Collected:
https://bjornlarssen.com/author

Fantasy Focus: Comedic Fantasy- Featuring Kyle Lockhaven

This week I’m focusing on comedic fantasy. Today, I’m privileged to be able to feature Kyle Lockhaven, author of The Conjuring of Zoth-Avarex: The Self-Proclaimed Greatest Dragon in the Multiverse.

Comedic fantasy is kind of niche, and we kind of like it that way. Of course we comedic fantasy authors wouldn’t exactly scoff at the idea of writing best-sellers or buying luxurious beach houses with the money from our book sales, but I think most of us are resigned to the idea that such things are not to be seen in the crystal balls of this world. And now I’ve invoked the idea of the world having balls, and it’s only the first paragraph. Oops.

My path to writing humorous fantasy is a strange one. Not many people know this, but I started out my writing “career” many years ago. My first book was a serious story that fell somewhere in between Middle Grade and Young Adult. My second was an historical fiction, and my third was a crime drama type thing. I kept trying to find “my thing,” and although I loved each of my books, they all lacked…something.

My editor, and the few beta readers I had (my mom, brother, and one friend) all told me the same things. The best parts of my books were the moments of levity and humor. Also, I wrote a fantasy element into the crime story, and they said that part was really good. I had loved fantasy growing up, but, for some stupid reason, I was reluctant to write in the genre.

When not writing, I work as a firefighter at a nuclear site, and I always wanted to satirize the ridiculous governmental bureaucracy there, but I could never find the right angle. Then one day, I thought, “What if this site was here to conjure a dragon from another world?” The silliness of it really took me, and the ideas began to flow. I dropped the idiotic pretense and embraced the silliness of it all, and all of the fun fantasy elements, too.

I had been trying way too hard to be cool, when the best thing I could do was to just be the goofball that I was.

The thing is, I always loved comedic fantasy. Monty Python and the Holy Grail was and is the funniest thing ever, in my opinion. I love the silly social commentary, as well as the complete nonsense. And when I discovered Terry Pratchett, I realized that sort of thing could be consumed in book form, too. But the Discworld books were imbued with deeper meaning, and even more biting social commentary.

All (or at least the vast majority) of us comedic fantasy authors look up to Sir Terry Pratchett, the godfather of the genre. But we have branched off from him in so many different ways. I was heavily inspired by The Bartimaeus Trilogy by Jonathan Stroud, which manifested its humor through the snark of the titular (huh, huh) character. Most of the humor in my books comes from the interaction between characters who are being a bit snarky to each other. Other authors, like Sean Gibson, are kings of puns and clever wordplay, while others, like Bjørn Larssen, are able to somehow bind deep, philosophical topics together with the silliness, and others, like Quenby Olson, use subtle snark, societal observations, and fourth wall breaking to hilarious effect.

I am in the middle of posting a series of interviews about humor in books on my little blog. One of the questions I have asked everyone is, “On a scale from 1 to 10, what level of humor do you usually like to read?” The answers have varied, but I would say the average is right around a 4. That has made me wonder, what level does a book have to be at to be considered Comedic Fantasy?

Many people site Joe Abercrombie when talking about humor in fantasy. His books are the definition of Grimdark, but they’re infused with a lot of humor. I’ve heard people say the humor level is a 3 or 4.

If I had to be honest, I would rank my last book (The Conjuring of Zoth-Avarex) at a 7 or 8. And I fully realize that it is WAY too much for a lot of people. That’s one thing I’ve come to learn about writing humorous fantasy; it’s not for everyone. And that’s okay, because it makes me feel a strong bond with the readers who do like my humor.

It’s tough to “break out” as an author of comedic fantasy. One of the biggest success stories was Orconomics by J. Zachary Pike, which won SPFBO in 2018. Another was Kings of the Wyld, by Nicholas Eames, which currently has 3,697 reviews on Amazon. But those kinds of books are few and far between.

Personally, I’m happy to have any kind of following, and I hope to thoroughly entertain the readers I have found and have yet to find. I want to make them laugh, and think, and even feel while turning the pages of my books. I might not ever grab the world by the crystal balls, but I’ll have a lot of fun reaching for them. Er, let me try that again. I may never reach Mr. Eames’ level of success, but I will have a lot of fun reaching for it!

About the author:

KRR (Kyle Robert Redundant) Lockhaven writes fun, humorous fantasy with ever-increasing infusions of heart. His first book, The Conjuring of Zoth-Avarex: The Self-Proclaimed Greatest Dragon in the Multiverse, can be found here https://www.amazon.com/Conjuring-Zoth-Avarex-Self-Proclaimed-Greatest-Multiverse/dp/1098351509/  He recently signed a three-book deal with Shadow Spark Publishing, and his page can be found here: https://shadowsparkpub.com/krr-lockhaven

Fantasy Focus: Comedic Fantasy

This year, I want to talk about some of the many types of fantasy you can find (I have a post about fantasy subgenres which can be found here). I think when people hear “fantasy”, their mind immediately goes to serious epics with swords, magic, and dragons. While I happen to love all of those things, there are many ways to tell a story. For the first of my Fantasy Focus series, I want to take a look at comedic fantasy.

 Irreverent and witty, fantasy comedy often takes a humorous look at the fantasy genre, either creating new and entertaining fantasy worlds that focus on humor, parodying common fantasy tropes, or even poking lighthearted fun at specific works of fantasy.

Here is a list of some of side-splitting authors and some of the books they’ve written, in case you’re looking for suggestions on where to start! This is by no means anywhere close to a complete list of fantastic comedic fantasy authors that can be found, so please chip in with suggestions!

In case you missed them, I’ve posted links to this week’s interviews and guest articles as well. Enjoy!

Guest Authors:

Fantasy Focus: Comedic Fantasy- Featuring Andi Ewington

Fantasy Focus: Comedic Fantasy- Featuring Sean Gibson

Fantasy Focus: Comedic Fantasy- Featuring Kyle Lockhaven

Fantasy Focus: Comedic Fantasy- Featuring Bjørn Larssen 

Fantasy Focus: Comedic Fantasy- Featuring D.H. Willison

Fantasy Focus: Comedic Fantasy- Featuring Claire Buss

Book Suggestions:

Douglas Adams– Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency

D.B. Bray & Wahida Clark- Loners: A Humorous Dwarven Adventure Fantasy

Adam Jacob Burgess- The Actum Tempus Saga

Claire Buss– The Roshaven series

Andi Ewington– Campaigns and Companions: the Complete Role-Playing Guide for Pets (with Rhianna Pratchett); The Hero Interviews

Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett– Good Omens

Sean Gibson– The Part About the Dragon Was (Mostly) True; Dragons of a Different Tale (one of a collection of short stories)

William Goldman– The Princess Bride

Kevin Hearne & Delilah S. Dawson– The Tales of Pell series

Diane Wynne Jones– Chrestomanci series

Bjørn Larssen– Why Odin Drinks; Creation

K.R.R. Lockhaven- The Conjuring of Zoth-Avarex: The Self-Proclaimed Greatest Dragon in the Multiverse; Zoth-Avarex’s Escape Plan: A Pick-Your-Own-Path Experience

Christopher Moore– Fool; Shakespeare for Squirrels

M.J. Northwood– Game of Gnomes: The Necrognomicon

Terry Pratchett– the Discworld series

Robert Rankin– The Brentford series

Echo Shea– A Tinfoil Hat of My Own: A Tale of Friendship, Bikers, and Werewolves

Keith Tokash– Iliad: the Reboot; Odyssey: the Reboot: A Hooligan’s Tale

D.H. Willison– Tales of Aravia series; Hazelhearth Hires Heroes