For the Wolf by Hannah Whitten

The first daughter is for the Throne.
The second daughter is for the Wolf.

For fans of Uprooted and The Bear and the Nightingale comes a dark, sweeping debut fantasy novel about a young woman who must be sacrificed to the legendary Wolf of the Wood to save her kingdom. But not all legends are true, and the Wolf isn’t the only danger lurking in the Wilderwood.

“A masterful debut from a must-read new voice in epic fantasy”—Kirkus (starred review) 

As the only Second Daughter born in centuries, Red has one purpose—to be sacrificed to the Wolf in the Wood in the hope he’ll return the world’s captured gods.

Red is almost relieved to go. Plagued by a dangerous power she can’t control, at least she knows that in the Wilderwood, she can’t hurt those she loves. Again.

But the legends lie. The Wolf is a man, not a monster. Her magic is a calling, not a curse. And if she doesn’t learn how to use it, the monsters the gods have become will swallow the Wilderwood—and her world—whole. (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to Angela Man at Orbit Books for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. For the Wolf is available now.

Mysterious with its fair share of magic, For the Wolf had a very classic (as in pre-Disney) fairy tale feel to it. While I felt that some elements worked incredibly well, there were a couple of things that distracted me a little. I am pretty sure I’m in the minority on this one, as the things I didn’t really connect with are usually things that draw people into books. I’m funny like that.

Red has known for ages that her entire purpose in life is to be a sacrifice. The beginning of the book shows her both resigned and (a little) relieved. She has a power that has hurt her loved ones in the past which makes her feel like a danger to those she cares about, including her sister, Neve. The relationship Neve and Red have is my absolute favorite thing about For the Wolf. Their love for each other is the catalyst for much that happens, and a huge part of their characters. I loved seeing their relationship affect every choice they made. Their love for each other really is a part of who they are.

The beginning felt slow to me. I struggled to become interested in the plot because it was originally explained in-between scenes of Red getting ready for a party in honor of her sacrifice. I would start to become invested in the story arc, then get distracted by the details the author gave. It just wasn’t my bag. I doubt my reaction will be shared by many readers in this case, but it was a little off-putting.

Once Red got to the forest, things picked up and moved along quickly. Neve is determined to save Red, no matter the cost. Red is determined to fulfill her role and protect others, no matter the cost. This is an interesting conglomeration of multiple fairy tales, woven together into something new. I have to give the author major points for creativity: she tied several disparate plots together into something very different.

Here’s where those who have read my blog for a while know I lost interest: the love story. It wasn’t overbearing or anything like that, I’m just not big on love stories taking front and center in a book. As far as love stories go, it was a good one, I guess. It’s just not my thing. This is absolutely a case of “it’s not you, it’s me”. I was definitely the wrong reader.

The book itself is well written and fans of fairy tale retellings that lean in a romance direction will love it. While For the Wolf wasn’t necessarily what I look for in a book, it is an excellent addition to the fantasy-romance subgenre, one that I think will be loved by many.