Tales of Magic & Destiny: Twelve Tales of Fantasy by Ricardo Victoria, Maria Haskins, Tom Jolly, and More

Take a trip into worlds of fantasy – where magic and destinies are very real and could be very deadly. Twelve writers delve into dungeons, cross battlefields, challenge prophecies and conjure up characters ready to face the gods themselves. Discover 12 new legends of fantasy – and explore these worlds of imagination.

From stories about fierce battles to tales of mysteries and faith (and even one story that seemed reminiscent of A Pilgrim’s Progress!), Tales of Magic & Destiny has something for everyone. I was so impressed by how unique and different each story was from the one before it.

I never know how to review a collection of stories: do I review every single story, or leave some to be discovered by the reader? I think I’ll go for the latter because there’s something special about coming across an unexpected gem.

Tales of Magic and Destiny started out strongly with Stars Above, Shadows Beneath by Maria Haskins. This tale focused on Ny’am, returning to her childhood home as conqueror after being treated poorly growing up. Only her triumphant return seems like anything but. This was a story about forgiveness and faith, with a bit of violence thrown in for good measure. It was well written and set the tone for the rest of the book.

I loved Out of the Dust by Leo Mcbride. There was an immediate lore and entire world hinted at, one which was creative and seemed fraught with peril. I was hooked from the get-go. The story follows Tarras, a reluctant leader trying to keep her people alive in a very unhospitable place. A stranger shows up, one who is seen as incredibly dangerous, to be kept locked up at all costs, followed by a more immediate danger. Tarras is faced with the decision: which danger is worse? I would have loved to see this story continue on for much longer, although the ending was fantastic.

Asherah’s Pilgrimage by Ricardo Victoria was another standout for me. Ostensibly about a character trying to lead her people to a better life, it is in actuality an introspective examination of resilience, strength of character, and doing what’s right even when it’s hard. Oh–and there’s a dragon! I’m a sucker for dragons anyway, and this dragon is snarky and fun.

This is a strong collection of stories, certain to please any fantasy fan. I could see the talent that each author brought to the table. I thoroughly enjoyed Tales of Magic and Destiny.

Wild and Wicked Things by Francesca May


On Crow Island, people whisper, real magic lurks just below the surface. 

Neither real magic nor faux magic interests Annie Mason. Not after it stole her future. She’s only on the island to settle her late father’s estate and, hopefully, reconnect with her long-absent best friend, Beatrice, who fled their dreary lives for a more glamorous one. 

Yet Crow Island is brimming with temptation, and the biggest one may be her enigmatic new neighbor. 

Mysterious and alluring, Emmeline Delacroix is a figure shadowed by rumors of witchcraft. And when Annie witnesses a confrontation between Bea and Emmeline at one of the island’s extravagant parties, she is drawn into a glittering, haunted world. A world where the boundaries of wickedness are tested, and the cost of illicit magic might be death. (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to Redhook publishing for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Wild and Wicked Things will be available for purchase on March 29th.

Addictive and haunting, Wild and Wicked Things was also a bit problematic. The book initially drew me in with beautiful prose, dripping with magic and secrets. However, the pacing caused me to pause and I found my attention wandering at parts.

I was immediately interested in the book’s setting, which has a wild and carefree overtone with more somber themes lurking just underneath the surface. I’ve read that it takes inspiration from The Great Gatsby, and the juxtaposition of the darker aspects of the storyline with the glitter that’s seen on the surface felt very reminiscent of Gatsby to me. That being said, Wild and Wicked Things is very much its own unique book.

There was quite a bit of content that I struggled to read. The fault is mine: the author has kindly provided a content warning list for the book (here) which I was unaware of when I picked it up. That being said, I feel that the author did not add any of it merely for shock value; rather, it was all part of the story she envisioned and it did further the plot.

I loved the lush feel of the book, and the glitz of it all. I was fascinated by the mysteries lurking beneath the surface. Ultimately, though, the bits that didn’t work for me- the characters that weren’t quite as fully-rounded as I was hoping and the pacing issues- lessened my enjoyment a little. That being said, I am sure that there are many who will find themselves lost in a beautiful world and will appreciate the slower pacing. Give it a go!

Wildwood Whispers by Willa Reece

At the age of eleven, Mel Smith’s life found its purpose when she met Sarah Ross. Ten years later, Sarah’s sudden death threatens to break her. To fulfill a final promise to her best friend, Mel travels to an idyllic small town nestled in the Appalachian Mountains. Yet Morgan’s Gap is more than a land of morning mists and deep forest shadows.
 
There are secrets that call to Mel, in the gaze of the gnarled and knowing woman everyone calls Granny, in a salvaged remedy book filled with the magic of simple mountain traditions, and in the connection she feels to the Ross homestead and the wilderness around it.

With every taste of sweet honey and tart blackberries, the wildwood twines further into Mel’s broken heart. But a threat lingers in the woods—one that may have something to do with Sarah’s untimely death and that has now set its sight on Mel.

The wildwood is whispering. It has secrets to reveal—if you’re willing to listen . . .(taken from Amazon)

Thank you to Orbit Books and Angela Man for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Wildwood Whispers is available now.

Wildwood Whispers was enchanting and beautiful. There was something special in the prose, in the way the book took its time, describing everything so well that I felt like I was standing right next to the main character. While I wasn’t entirely sure where the book was going for a good chunk of it, I was enthralled by the writing and more than happy to follow along as it twined together what originally seemed like two separate storylines, weaving them into a beautiful whole.

The book follows Mel, a prickly individual who has just lost her best friend- her lifeline, really. Mel travels to the tiny town of Morgan’s Gap, deep in the Appalachian mountains, to scatter her best friend’s ashes. There, Mel finds mysteries waiting to be solved and dangers lurking around every corner. She also finds the chance to heal, if she’s brave enough to take it.

I really enjoyed watching Mel grow into herself. Her interactions with others were fantastic, but just as great was her inner dialogue. She found the kind of strength that comes from being hurt and allowing yourself to care anyway. Add in the supporting cast and this small town seems both simultaneously cozier and larger.

The other characters include Granny, who kind of takes Mel under her wing. There’s Lu, who makes magic with her music, and Jacob Walker, who seems to be hiding something. There is also a super creepy cult, the sort of backwards group that Netflix makes documentaries about. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised to hear that it was based on an actual cult. The reverend shivered my skin. I wish that Granny played a slightly bigger role because I loved her so much. However, all of the characters were individuals with their own special things to offer.

I loved that, while magic was most definitely a part of Wildwood Whispers, the “big bad” wasn’t some sort of magical entity. Instead, the villains were all too human, which made things more chilling. Author Willa Reece wrote a beautiful and dangerous book, a treasure in literary form. I felt an immense sense of satisfaction at the way the different pieces in the book fit together neatly, but with room left for wondering.

Wildwood Whispers felt a little like a mystery and a little like a calm daydream. The combination was charming and surprising in equal measure. This book was unique and special. I highly recommend it.