Odyssey: The Reboot: A Hooligan’s Tale by Keith Tokash

Homer’s back, and this time, it’s personal.

Odysseus, cleverest of Greeks, is missing. Having survived war, betrayal, and his own fat mouth, Gelios discovers himself oathsworn to find his friend, and save the kingdom of Ithaca.

With his squabbling entourage, Gelios careens through the Mediterranean in a desperate bid to save Odysseus and reunite antiquity’s most annoying family. Fleeing a trail of mercenaries, bad decisions, and angry women, the group struggles to answer one of humanity’s most enduring questions:

Why the hell is this my problem? (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to the author for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Odyssey: The Reboot is available for purchase now.

Odyssey: The Reboot: A Hooligan’s Tale is that wonderful mix of completely irreverent and smart that is so hard to find. I loved author Keith Tokash’s take on the Iliad (review here), and he continues in fine form here. The thing about “classics” such as the Odyssey is that they’re ripe for parody. There’s nothing like lovingly poking fun at a timeless tale that is pretty much required reading for every junior high school student. Tokash uses the classic to craft a fast-moving “true story” about the events of the Odyssey and it is hilarious.

Once again, Gelios (the cousin of Homer) crashed through an epic, causing mayhem. Gelios was pretty much born with his foot in his mouth, yet he is also somehow endearing. He’s a fantastic main character and reading the shenanigans he finds himself in was so much fun!

The writing is snappy, the humor is dry and witty, and the story is a blast. The author has taken everything that worked well in his first book (which was pretty much everything) and somehow made it even better. You don’t need to read Iliad: The Reboot to enjoy this book, although I highly recommend it. In a year (decade?) where humor is as good as gold, Odyssey: The Reboot: A Hooligan’s Tale delivers. Go ahead and grab both books; you’ll thank me.

A Spindle Splintered (Fractured Fables) by Alix E. Harrow

It’s Zinnia Gray’s twenty-first birthday, which is extra-special because it’s the last birthday she’ll ever have. When she was young, an industrial accident left Zinnia with a rare condition. Not much is known about her illness, just that no-one has lived past twenty-one.

Her best friend Charm is intent on making Zinnia’s last birthday special with a full sleeping beauty experience, complete with a tower and a spinning wheel. But when Zinnia pricks her finger, something strange and unexpected happens, and she finds herself falling through worlds, with another sleeping beauty, just as desperate to escape her fate. (taken from Amazon)

Here’s the thing: Alix E. Harrow is a brilliant writer. She could write a book about the color taupe and I would stand in line to read it. She’s that good. So when I heard about A Spindle Splintered, I grabbed it as quickly as possible. I didn’t know too much about it, but I knew I needed to read it.

I was a little surprised at how short it was. I expected it to be longer based on Harrow’s last few books (which I highly suggest reading, by the way). I am always a littles hesitant about shorter books, wondering whether they can tell complete tales as well as a longer novel can. That’s a silly hang-up on my part since I’ve read many shorter novels that have been absolutely amazing, but we all have our failings.

The author embraces the shorter format, eschewing long character introductions in favor of quick ones with the development continuing at a rapid pace throughout the rest of the story. While there is no doubt that the characters are fully rounded (especially Charm), I do wish that there had been time to really get into the nitty gritty of what made them tick. For example, Zinnia has spent her entire life in a tug of war between trying to do the things that every kid and teen does and the awareness that she is living on borrowed time. I would have loved to see more of that struggle and view how that has shaped her every action. There is a bit of explanation about her relationship with her parents which I found very interesting but I would have loved to see more.

I loved that there wasn’t a ton of lead up to the main event. Instead, we are pretty much tossed right in, which added to the tone of unbelievability meets why the crap not? that pervaded the story. The side characters were great, especially the witch that cursed the Sleeping Beauty that Zinnia meets. That whole confrontation did not go at all the way I expected and I was completely on board with that.

There wasn’t a lot of time spent on the world building because there didn’t need to be. It was every fairy tale you’ve ever read, every fantasy trope played out in exaggerated detail. It worked very well for the plot as everyone knows the original story of Sleeping Beauty (or at the very least, the Disney version) and this was a new take on the tale. There didn’t need to be a ton of explanation. That being said, Alix E. Harrow made sure to provide extra details where it was needed, without slowing the pace of the book, again showing off her writing chops.

There are Arthur Rackham illustrations throughout, which provided an enchanting touch, if a wee bit twisted. In fact, the entire book points out the less-than-savory parts of fairy tales and fables, and finds ways to compare them to the less-than-wonderful things in real life. It was very well done.

My big quibble with A Spindle Splintered is that I really didn’t like the length. I wanted more. More detail, more expansion, more from the final confrontation. Not because the book was bad, but because Alix E. Harrow is such a good writer. I wanted to live in her story for much longer than I was able to.

At the end of the day, I really did enjoy A Spindle Splintered, but not nearly as much as I loved The Once and Future Witches and The Ten Thousand Doors of January. In this case, definitely blame the reader and not the book.

Iliad: The Reboot by Keith Tokash

Iliad: The Reboot by [Tokash, Keith]

History cares about kings, but the gods love a buffoon.

The hapless young soldier Gelios faces execution for offending his king. Desperate, he accidentally volunteers his cousin to chronicle the coming war.

Equipped with only a sword and a stunning lack of judgment, Gelios must keep his cousin alive amid the greatest war of an era. Worse, he must survive the egos of the two most powerful kings in their army.

But his deadliest struggle is with his mouth. Can he keep it shut long enough to make it home alive?

The Iliad has long been the definitive source of knowledge surrounding the kings, gods, and heroes of the Trojan War. Now, for the first time, readers can experience the clash of two ancient superpowers through the eyes of the biggest jackass in history. (taken from Amazon)

Thank you to the author for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. This book is available for purchase now.

This is the book that launched a thousand laughs! Equally hilarious and smart, every moment of this well-crafted comedy was perfect. Perfection is hard to come by, especially when retelling a classic, but that’s what this book is.

It was impossible to put down. Not literally; I could put it down if I had to, but I really didn’t want to. Told from the point of view of Gelios, the cousin of Pelos (ahem- Homer), this satire of the epic poem happily took every part of the original and twisted it into the funniest possible telling. Gelios was hilariously unable to keep his mouth shut, even when it behooved him to do so. It got both himself and Pelos into no end of trouble (it’s amazing he kept his head long enough to tell the full story).

The language was quippy and updated; think snark instead of flowery. It flowed well and there were no slow or unnecessary bits or characters. Even the nicknames added to the fun of the book: I particularly liked “Aggy”.

Should you read this book? Abso-freaking-lutely! I’d advise that you get to it sooner rather than later. You’ll thank me.