Storytellers on Tour Cover Reveal: Living Waters by Dan Fitzgerald

I am so excited to be joining Storytellers on Tour in introducing Dan Fitzgerald’s new book, The Living Waters! Dan Fitzgerald’s previous series, The Maer Cycle, was fantastic. He’s an author with something new and unique to offer to the fantasy genre, and The Living Waters looks to be something completely original. Dan has described it as “sword-free fantasy”, the sort of world where “we use fantasy to explore relationships and the human experience through a different lens, one that doesn’t have to involve so much violence.” * Fantasy can be the perfect backdrop for something like that because it creates a place to question, wonder, learn, and explore. The Living Waters looks to bring something special to fantasy and I’m excited for it!

So, when can you purchase The Living Waters?


Are you ready to see the cover?



Here it is!



The Living Waters by Dan Fitzgerald
Series: The Weirdwater Confluence (#1)
Published: October 15, 2021 by Shadow Spark Publishing
Genre: Sword-free Fantasy

Book Cover Illustration: Karkki AKA Kittensartbooks
Twitter: https://twitter.com/kittensartsboo1
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kittensartbooks/ 
Book Cover Design: Jessica Moon of Shadow Spark Pub
Twitter: https://twitter.com/jhlmoon


What is The Living Waters about?

When two painted-faced nobles take a guided raft trip on a muddy river, they expect to rough it for a few weeks before returning to their life of sheltered ease. But when mysterious swirls start appearing in the water, even their seasoned guides get rattled.  

The mystery of the swirls lures them on to seek the mythical wetlands known as the Living Waters. They discover a world beyond their imagining, but stranger still are the worlds they find inside their own minds as they are drawn deep into the troubles of this hidden place.  

The Living Waters is a sword-free fantasy novel featuring an ethereal love story, meditation magic, and an ancient book with cryptic marginalia.


About the author:

Dan Fitzgerald is the fantasy author of the Maer Cycle trilogy (character-driven low-magic fantasy) and the upcoming Weirdwater Confluence duology (sword-free fantasy with unusual love stories). The Living Waters comes out October 15, 2021 and The Isle of a Thousand Worlds arrives January 15, 2022, bothfrom Shadow Spark Publishing.  

He lives in Washington, DC with his wife, twin boys, and two cats. When not writing he might be found doing yoga, gardening, cooking, or listening to French music.  

Website: https://www.danfitzwrites.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DanFitzWrites

Goodreads: https://www.instagram.com/danfitzwrites/ 

Shadow Spark Publishing

Website: http://www.shadowsparkpub.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ShadowSparkPub Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shadowsparkpub/

  

*You can find Dan Fitzgerald’s article on Sword-free fantasy here: https://www.danfitzwrites.com/blog/sword-free-fantasy



Paladin Unbound by Jeffrey Speight- Storytellers on Tour


The last of a dying breed, a holy warrior must rise up against a growing darkness in Evelium.
 
The most unlikely of heroes, a lowly itinerant mercenary, Umhra the Peacebreaker is shunned by society for his mongrel half-Orc blood. Desperate to find work for himself and his band of fighters, Umhra agrees to help solve a rash of mysterious disappearances, but uncovers a larger, more insidious plot to overthrow the natural order of Evelium in the process.
 
As Umhra journeys into the depths of Telsidor’s Keep to search for the missing, he confronts an ancient evil and, after suffering a great loss, turns to the god he disavowed for help.
 
Compelled to save the kingdom he loves, can he defeat the enemy while protecting his true identity, or must he risk everything?


The most unlikely of heroes, a lowly itinerant mercenary, Umhra the Peacebreaker is shunned by society for his mongrel half-Orc blood. Desperate to find work for himself and his band of fighters, Umhra agrees to help solve a rash of mysterious disappearances, but uncovers a larger, more insidious plot to overthrow the natural order of Evelium in the process.
 
As Umhra journeys into the depths of Telsidor’s Keep to search for the missing, he confronts an ancient evil and, after suffering a great loss, turns to the god he disavowed for help.
 
Compelled to save the kingdom he loves, can he defeat the enemy while protecting his true identity, or must he risk everything?

Thank you to the author and Storytellers on Tour for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Paladin Unbound is available now.

When people ask for books I’d recommend to a fantasy newbie, ones that represent all the wonderful things the genre has to offer, I have a few go-tos. The Hobbit, obviously, and the Dragonlance Chronicles (really, is anyone surprised?), and, more recently, The Ventifact Colossus. Now I’m adding Paladin Unbound to that list, because this book would make anyone fall in love with fantasy.

The story starts with the main character, Umhra, just wanting to find work for himself and his band of mercenaries. When they are hired to find out what has happened to several missing people, they are thrust into a situation that is much darker and more dangerous than Umhra expected.

I was sucked in from page one, which begins at an ending. The ending of a war between gods, no less. The war ends with an asterisk, the sort that always leads to trouble down the road. What I loved about the opening is that it started huge, before moving on to the main storyline which is much more personal. It showcased a fascinating history, one that we continue to get snippets of throughout the book. I love when the history of a world or its belief systems is shared naturally like that, avoiding the dreaded info dump. I have to admit, though, I would actually read an entire book just dedicated to the history and mythology of the world of Evelium, I loved it so much. It was creative and well thought out.

As much as I enjoyed the world building, though, where Paladin Unbound shines is in its characters. There’s an excellent cast who build off each other in the best of ways. The interactions felt natural and allowed each character to grow and develop brilliantly. This was, in some ways, the typical adventuring group sometimes found in ttrpg’s – and that’s a great thing! It works very well, after all. There was Naivara the druid, Laudin the ranger, a mage named Nicholas (I have no idea why, but his name made me smile), Shadow the rogue, Balris the healer, Talus the fighter, and Gromley the warrior priest. While I loved all of them, I must say that I had a soft spot for Shadow.

Then there’s our main character, Umhra. Oh, how I loved Umhra! Being half-orc, he was distrusted, looked down on, or treated poorly quite a lot. He could have been bitter or angry and I wouldn’t have blamed him. But instead, he was an optimist, always looking for the best in every situation. He was, at his core, a good, honorable character. He was not your boring “lawful good”, however. He was incredibly nuanced and I loved reading about him. I haven’t been a huge fan of paladins in the past, but Umhra has me planning to make a paladin for my next D&D campaign.

This book would be perfect for fantasy newbies, ttrpg players, or readers who have traveled the length and breadth of many fantasy worlds and are looking for new adventures to go on. It left me excited and wanting more. Paladin Unbound is fantasy at its finest.

To read other great reviews of Paladin Unbound, make sure to check out Storytellers on Tour!

Where to find Paladin Unbound:

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/58022890-paladin-unbound

Literary Wanderlust: https://www.literarywanderlust.com/product-page/paladin-unbound

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1942856768

Barnes & Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/paladin-unbound-jeffrey-speight/1139410896

About the author:

Jeffrey Speight’s love of fantasy goes back to an early childhood viewing of the cartoon version of The Hobbit, when he first met an unsuspecting halfling that would change Middle Earth forever. Finding his own adventuring party in middle school, Jeff became an avid Dungeons & Dragons player and found a passion for worldbuilding and character creation. While he went on to a successful career as an investor, stories grew in his mind until he could no longer keep them inside. So began his passion for writing. Today, he lives in Connecticut with his wife, three boys (his current adventuring party), three dogs, and a bearded dragon. He has a firmly held belief that elves are cool, but half-orcs are cooler. While he once preferred rangers, he nearly always plays a paladin at the gaming table.

Website: https://www.jeffreyspeight.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeffspeight

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jeffsp8/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jeffreyspeightauthor

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/21486809.Jeffrey_Speight

Dragon Mage by M.L. Spencer- Storytellers on Tour

Aram Raythe has the power to challenge the gods. He just doesn’t know it yet.
 
Aram thinks he’s nothing but a misfit from a small fishing village in a dark corner of the world. As far as Aram knows, he has nothing, with hardly a possession to his name other than a desire to make friends and be accepted by those around him, which is something he’s never known.
 
But Aram is more. Much, much more.
 
Unknown to him, Aram bears within him a gift so old and rare that many people would kill him for it, and there are others who would twist him to use for their own sinister purposes. These magics are so potent that Aram earns a place at an academy for warrior mages training to earn for themselves the greatest place of honor among the armies of men: dragon riders.
 
Aram will have to fight for respect by becoming not just a dragon rider, but a Champion, the caliber of mage that hasn’t existed in the world for hundreds of years. And the land needs a Champion. Because when a dark god out of ancient myth arises to threaten the world of magic, it is Aram the world will turn to in its hour of need.

Thank you to the author and Storytellers on Tour for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Dragon Mage is available now.

Most readers have a “to be read” list: you know, that big, long list of books you plan to read that you hope to maybe get to before you kick it. Well, move Dragon Mage to the very, very top. Read it tomorrow. Actually, ignore all your important responsibilities and read it right now. I’ll wait. I flat-out guarantee that you’ll love it.

Dragon Mage is packed with excitement and heart. It tells the story of a child named Aram, a quiet boy who struggles to fit in. He learns that he has abilities not seen in the world in over a hundred years-the sort that could save everyone. With that revelation comes danger. It’s up to Aram, and those who love him (even though he sometimes thinks he’s unlovable) to do the exceptional.

Holy crap, I loved Aram so much! Shy and unassuming, even the smallest moments with him had the power to melt my heart. He gave his all and then some. I loved his inner dialogue. Seeing the story unfold though his eyes was fascinating. Despite everything he goes through-and author M.L. Spencer puts him through the wringer- Aram never loses that sweet and vulnerable nature. In a genre that sometimes forgets to give characters anything less than fearless tough-stuff attitudes, Aram was a breath of fresh air.

Aram’s interactions with his friend Markus (the very first friend he’s ever had!) were pure gold. Markus had a strong moral compass and an unassuming nature. He saw the wonderful personality in Aram that others sometimes overlooked. Watching his story unfold was engrossing because I could never guess what would happen next with him. In fact, I was constantly surprised by Dragon Mage. Oh, and did I mention that, as the title suggests, there were dragons? I love dragons and having them in this already amazing book was just icing on the cake.

The story was beyond creative. It was ambitious and thought-provoking, and even the most villainous felt they were doing what was needed. Let me tell you, there was a character that I absolutely loathed. I mean that as a compliment. He was such a horrible excuse for a human being, but he was not just an archetype. Rather, he was incredibly well developed, just like every other character in the book.

Dragon Mage is everything I love about the fantasy genre. This book is unforgettable, and I’m going to be yelling at everyone to read this for a good long while. It isn’t too often that I call a book perfect, but that’s what Dragon Mage is. It is absolutely perfect.

To read other amazing reviews for Dragon Mage, go to Storytellers on Tour

About the Author:

ML Spencer lives in Southern California with her three children and two cats. She has been obsessed with fantasy ever since the days of childhood bedtime stories. She grew up reading and writing fantasy fiction, playing MMORPG games, and living, as mom put it, “in her own worlds.” ML now spends each day working to bring those worlds into reality.

Website: http://mlspencerfiction.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MLSpencerAuthor

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/m_l_spencer/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorMLSpencer


Where to find Dragon Mage:

Amazon
Goodreads

The End of Dreams (The Gifted and the Cursed book #3) by Marcus Lee- Storytellers on Tour

As Daleth the Witch-King and his horde ready themselves for the final battle, a small alliance prepares for a desperate last stand.
However, the alliance is weak and fractured, led by a king interested only in retaining his wealth and a lord commander consumed by his thirst for revenge. With a seemingly unbeatable army before them, invisible foes amongst them, and broken hearts between them, the alliance appears destined to fall.
Yet in these dark times, her light almost extinguished, a peasant huntress is soon to be queen. But if she can find what was lost, she might prove to be more powerful than two kings combined.
This war will bring about the end of dreams, but for whom, the gods have yet to decide.

Thank you to Storytellers on Tour for giving me the opportunity to read and review The End of Dreams. This book is available now. Not only that, the first book, Kings and Daemons, is currently free on Amazon Kindle (starting March third and ending on the seventh).

I am excited to be finishing what has been an awesome series. I’m also a little sad because, well, it’s ending. The Gifted and the Cursed series has been excellent from the start. And let me say, it ends brilliantly.

The End of Dreams starts pretty much right where Tristan’s Folly ended, and the reader is dropped smack into the middle of it. Our main players have been scattered to the wind, which can be a risky move, but worked perfectly here. It allowed the plot to grow and encompass everyone in ways that were both unexpected and fascinating. It also created a balance between physical battles and those of the mind.

One of the (many) things that I have appreciated about this series has been its tone. It is grim and dark, but this has always been offset by a layer of hope. This continued in The End of Dreams. Despite the challenges the characters faced, some which felt pretty insurmountable, they keep on going. That being said, the effects that things have had on the characters is made evident, with each of them handling it differently. Some of them found strength they didn’t know they had. Some found ways to cope that weren’t necessarily very smart. Each choice was fascinating and made perfect sense to the character’s personality. And that’s the thing. These characters were worth hoping for and being invested in. They were three-dimensional and unique.

Sometimes the final book in a series can seem small because everything is shrinking to a final confrontation. Not so with The End of Dreams. The world continued to grow and develop, as new characters and cultures were introduced. It made the stakes seem even more important. The book continued to highlight how things would effect everyone, not just the main characters.

The pacing was fantastic, with moments of character interactions liberally interspersed with fight scenes. And the fight scenes! They were raw and gritty, exactly what I love to see in a fantasy book. The tension built up to a crescendo, exploding at exactly the right moment. The ending came rushing up and I was left astounded and incredibly impressed. It finished perfectly. I am left feeling a little sad that it has ended, but that’s the mark of a great book: that it can leave a reader a little bereft when the adventure ends. I hope to see much more from author Marcus Lee in the future.

In the meantime, I highly suggest picking this series up. Be sure to click on Storytellers on Tour to read other reviews for The End of Dreams.

About the author:

Writing hasn’t always been a serious hobby for me … but it has always been there, lurking in the shadows, serving me well when called upon.

As I look back over the years, I realise I was guilty of writing many short stories, as well as poetry, and I’d like to think, that even if they were never intended to be published, they were nonetheless warmly received by the intended recipients.

Then in 2019, I was inspired to write not just a short story, or poetry, but a book. Then, suddenly, one book turned into a trilogy and a labour of love, and it was a love I wanted to share with the world.

So, here we are. The pandemic that put my career in sport on hold also gave me the opportunity to lavish time on my alternative hobby, or if demand dictates my new career.

However, only you, the reader, will decide whether this trilogy, which is still a work in progress, will be the first of many. I genuinely hope so.

Who knows, now these creatives juices are flowing, I might just keep on writing anyway.

—–

Epic fantasy has been my favourite genre since I first read The Odyssey and The Illiad as a seven-year-old. Now it’s my turn to see if I can bring another world to life in the imagination of others.

Website: https://www.marcusleebooks.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarcusLeebooks

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Marcusleebooks

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/1361488.Marcus_Lee

Newsletter: https://www.marcusleebooks.com/contact

The Ventifact Colossus by Dorian Hart- Storytellers on Tour

Book Blurb:
Banished to an otherworldly prison for centuries, the monstrous Emperor Naradawk is about to break free and wreak havoc upon the world of Spira. The archmage Abernathy can no longer keep the monster at bay, and has summoned a collection of would-be heroes to help set things right.

Surely he made a mistake. These *can’t* be the right people.

Dranko is priest-turned-pickpocket, expelled from his church for his antics. Kibilhathur is a painfully shy craftsman who speaks to stones. Aravia is a wizard’s apprentice whose intellect is eclipsed only by her arrogance. Ernest is a terrified baker’s son. Morningstar is a priestess forbidden from daylight. Tor is a young nobleman with attention issues. Ysabel is an elderly farm woman. Grey Wolf is a hard-bitten mercenary.

None of them are qualified to save the world, but they’ll have to do. Even Abernathy himself seems uncertain as to why he chose them.

What starts with a simple scouting mission soon spirals into something more far-reaching and sinister. The heroes will contest with dream warriors, evil cultists, sentient gemstones, and a devious yet infuriatingly polite gentleman with a perfect mustache, on their way to a desperate encounter with the unstoppable: The Ventifact Colossus.

The Ventifact Colossus is Book One of the Heroes of Spira.

My Review:

Thank you to the author for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Also, thank you to Storytellers on Tour for allowing me to join this tour. Books one through three of the Heroes of Spira series are available now, with book four, The Infinite Tower, coming out on April 30th.

One of the things I love about fantasy is that you can take a commonality – like a group of unlikely heroes – and make it something new and different. In The Ventifact Colossus, author Dorian Hart created a world that is full of adventure and heart. Brace yourselves, folks: this is going to be a rave.

Where should I start? First of all, the characters were fabulous. The book opens with Dranko, a priest-turned-thief who just happens to also be part human, part goblin. He’s bristly, but a good guy underneath a tough exterior. You can tell he’s been kicked around by life a bit. He finds himself with an unexpected new employer: a wizard who has gathered a ragtag group of possible-heroes. Dranko ends up traveling with several others, each with their own personality and struggles, in an attempt to prevent a very bad thing (no spoilers from me). However, as much as I loved the storyline, it was the well-written characters that won me over.

There is a three-way tie for my favorite characters. Yes, I know that’s a bit ridiculous, but I can’t narrow it down more than that. I thought Dranko was fascinating and had hidden depth. Every time I thought I figured him out, a new facet of his personality would be revealed. I also loved the kindly older woman, Mrs. Horn. She was so sweet, but had a steel backbone. She wasn’t a fighter, like some of the others, nor was she a healer, but her role was vital to the group nonetheless. And Ernie! Oh, how I loved that character! He was a jumble of low self-esteem and a huge heart. Watching his character grow and evolve was so much fun!

I love how interconnected everything was. One thing would have ramifications for others that I never saw coming. It was never done just for convenience though, and the world never felt small. On the contrary, the world was vast and felt Tolkien-esqe (ish?) in that I knew there were things left undiscovered and yet to be experienced. I’ve continued on in the series, and let me just say: the world continues to be large and intriguing.

Perhaps my favorite thing about The Ventifact Colossus is its underlying theme of hope and the goodness of people. Don’t get me wrong: the stakes are high, and the author definitely loves making the reader emotional (I’m still salty about a particular scene), but the pages didn’t scream, “Doooommmm!” at me every time I opened the book.

This is the sort of book that reminds me why fantasy is my favorite genre. Come for the adventure, stay for the amazing characters. I highly recommend this book, and the series continues to be fantastic.

Find more great reviews for The Ventifact Colossus on Storytellers on Tour!

About the author:

Dorian Hart is the author of the Heroes of Spira epic fantasy series, which currently includes The Ventifact Colossus, The Crosser’s Maze, and The Greatwood Portal. The fourth book, The Infinite Tower, should be out in February or March of 2021.

In a bygone century, Dorian graduated from Wesleyan University with a degree in creative writing. This led circuitously to a 20-year career as a video game designer, where he contributed to many award-winning titles including Thief, System Shock, System Shock 2, and BioShock.

Now he writes books in his Boston-area study, serves as the stay-at-home dad for his two teenage daughters, and happily allows his wife to drag him off on various wilderness adventures. He also spends time torturing his piano, playing the sport of pickleball, losing at board games, making terrible dad jokes, and trembling beneath the shadow of his towering TBR.

Website: https://dorianhart.com/the-heroes-of-spira/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DorianHart

The Part About the Dragon was (Mostly) True by Sean Gibson- Storytellers on Tour

Sure, you think you know the story of the fearsome dragon, Dragonia. How it terrorized the village of Skendrick until a brave band of heroes answered the noble villagers’ call for aid. How nothing could stop those courageous souls from facing down the dragon. How they emerged victorious and laden with treasure.
But, even in a world filled with epic adventures and tales of derring-do, where dragons, goblins, and unlicensed prestidigitators run amok, legendary heroes don’t always know what they’re doing. Sometimes they’re clueless. Sometimes beleaguered townsfolk are more halpess than helpless. And orcs? They’re not always assholes, and sometimes they don’t actually want to eat your children.

Heloise the Bard, Erithea’s most renowned storyteller (at least, to hear her tell it), is here to set the record straight. See, it turns out adventuring isn’t easy, and true heroism is as rare as an articulate villager.

Having spent decades propagating this particular myth (which, incidentally, she wrote), she’s finally able to tell the real story- for which she just so happened to have a front row seat.
Welcome to Erithea. I hope you brought a change of undergarments-things are going to get messy.


I’m so grateful to Storytellers on Tour for the opportunity to be able to read and review this book! This is available for purchase now.

Witty and snarktastic, The Part About the Dragon Was (Mostly) True is a highly entertaining journey through the lighter side of fantasy. Before I get into the nitty or the gritty, I have to just point out how cool it is to have a bard in a main role. Now (rolls up sleeves): let’s move on to the main event, shall we?

The story gets a kick in the pants when the people (I’ll leave the argument of villagers vs. citizens firmly between the pages) of Skendrick hire a group of heroes to divest them of their dragon problem. Heloise the Bard (…”if not the most well-known bard in Erithea (yet), arguably the most talented, and unarguably the cleverest”) gets a front row seat to what will surely be the stuff of legend. Let’s just say, it’s the stuff of…something.

Instead of glorious heroes, we get a motley collection of “what the crud is this?” characters, the sort that are lovable but just so bad at life. If I had to pick a favorite, it would have to be the oversized, cranky ,talking rat. I was also a huge fan of Heloise herself, of course. I loved the random blathering tangents that she would go on.

While the humor felt a little forced from time to time, there were enough laugh-out-loud moments to place this book in the “hilarious” category. The not-so-subtle knocking of common fantasy tropes were a lot of fun to read, and the characters cracked me up. The Part About the Dragon Was (Mostly) True will be perfect for anyone who needs a good laugh, and isn’t that pretty much everyone?

Check out all the wonderful reviews over at Storytellers on Tour.

Storytellers on Tour Blog Tour: Duckett and Dyer: Dicks for Hire by G.M. Nair

duckett-and-dyer-dicks-for-hire_nair_banner-blogs
I’m going to pull a fast one: I’ve already read (and loved) Duckett and Dyer: Dicks for Hire, so I’m going to review the second book in this series, Duckett and Dyer: The One-Hundred Percent Solution. Thank you to Storytellers on Tour for the opportunity to join in and rave about these books.

There might be some slight spoilers for Duckett and Dyer: Dicks for Hire in this review. Honestly, the books are so deliciously bizarre that you wouldn’t believe me if I gave you a play-by-play, although I’ll refrain. If you haven’t read the first book, you can find my review here).

Duckett and Dyer: The One-Hundred Percent Solution picks up pretty much right after the events of book one. After hopping through multiple universes, each one weirder than the last, life has returned to semi-normalcy for both Michael Duckett and Stephanie Dyer. Stephanie is attempting to ruin her detective business (totally on-brand for her), and Michael is working a soul-sucking job. There are a few changes, though: Michael has vowed to be a better friend to Stephanie. Stephanie, after a heart-to-heart with a future self, has made it her mission to protect Michael from any possible harm.

Unfortunately, Stephanie’s mission to destroy her own detective agency comes at a very bad time: Michael gets fired from his job. Fortunately, the detective duo finds themselves with something new to detect. They only get weird cases, and this one proves to be no exception.

The main characters are delightful. Michael has turned eye-rolling and long-suffering sighs into a fine art, and Stephanie is a walking Murphy’s Law. Of course there are many other fine characters, including an Illuminatist and an octopus-wearing cult member. It all makes sense in a zany sort of way.

The problem with this book is that it’s too freaking funny. I was forced to ignore any and all responsibilities to laugh my way through. It’s a real problem, I tell you. Also, I guffawed too loudly, almost spit my coffee across the room, and subjected my poor husband to snippets of the book without giving any context. Basically, this book turned me into an obnoxious jerk. I loved it.

Read this series.

Duckett & Dyer: Dicks For Hire - Kindle edition by Nair, G.M. ...